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Jack Dorsey

Jack Dorsey’s role at Twitter reduced because he’s ‘difficult to work with’

Given that Jack Dorsey helped found Twitter, you’d expect him to have an integral role in running the company. There’s a reason that current CEO Dick Costolo brought him back into the fold after a two and half-year hiatus. Except it’s not that simple.

Stuart Thomas: Senior Reporter
Stuart Thomas joined the Burn Media team in 2011 while finishing off an MA in South African Literature. Eager to prove his geek credentials, he allowed himself... More

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Costolo has, in fact, had to scale back Dorsey’s responsibilities. That’s because Twitter employees find him “difficult to work with” and are frustrated by the fact that he constantly changes his mind about the direction a project should take.

According to a profile on Costolo by the New York Times, Dorsey has effectively been shut out of the day-to-day operations of the company: “He no longer has anyone directly reporting to him, although he is still involved in strategic decisions”.

Dorsey’s role seems to have been scaled back to that of a sounding board for Costolo. He’s there, apparently, to ensure that any new features the company decides to roll out, still have a “Twittery” feel to them.

According to Michael Sippey, director of consumer product at Twitter “Dick does a good job of saying ‘Jack, what do you think?’”.

For his part, Dorsey refused to comment on his working relationship with anyone else at Twitter. Despite the fact that Costolo wasn’t there with Dorsey, Ev Williams, and Biz Stone from the very beginning of Twitter, Dorsey says he considers him a founder. “He’s had a dramatic impact on the company and the culture,” Dorsey said. “He’s questioned everything we started with and made it better.”

If being kept out of some aspects of Twitter has given Dorsey free time, he could always spend it on mobile payments company Square, which he also helped found. Right now however, it’s probably a good idea to keep him around, even if his role is limited. He’s always been good at product and was one of the driving forces behind the “new new” Twitter, which launched late last year.

The article also cites an insider who says that Twitter is aiming to go public in 2014. Costolo has repeatedly said that an IPO is not currently an option for the social network, which is starting to accelerate financially. “We’re an entire quarter ahead of our projected goals,” one executive says.

Incidentally 2014 is also the year that the company’s revenues are expected to reach US$1-billion.

Update: Dorsey has responded to questions about his role at Twitter.

  • http://www.facebook.com/jack.madison.796 Jack Madison

    There’s a really good reason “twitter” starts with Twit.
    Anyone who uses twitter is a “______”. It’s sickening to me to watching the downfall of the American Communication Forum via facebook and twitter. Sure, use facebook for close friends and family. Sure, use facebook to integrate throughout the internet to make comments and the like.
    But do you really have 389 friends? No. You don’t. Even if you’re Leonardo DiCaprio you do not have 389 friends.
    I have 24 friends. Thirteen are family, six are business and the remaining five are friends I talk to at least once a month/week.
    Twitter is for people that think their bowel movements are important. But once you get older you’ll realize how much of yourself you really put out there and regret it.
    This country is vacuous because people feel intelligence and maturity are unimportant.
    Nonsense. Maturity is how you learn about the things in life that matter. Because you can only receive information by handling it in a responsible fashion. Otherwise you’re just a knee jerk moron who doesn’t really know much about anything.

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