Check out Richard’s Dawkins’ trippy explanation of ‘memes’ [video]

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Dawkins Meme

“I’d rather spread memes than genes,” says Richard Dawkins. Most popularly known for his outspoken atheistic views, watch this British biologist perform a visual slash audio feast at Saatchi & Saatchi New Directors’ Showcase 2013 in Cannes.

Dawkins coined the term “meme” in his popular book, The Selfish Gene back in 1976. Since then, he has attacked religions across the globe and, apparently, honed the art of creating psychadelic performances.

Although coining the term while debating and fueling intellectual religious debates, memes have since made their way from the once 4Chan corners of our internet to the Facebook news feeds of today. In viral spirits, memes form a crucial part of your daily internet routine and thus part of our culture.

Try and keep up with what he’s saying; however trippy it may be, it’s all very interesting. You don’t need to be an atheist to appreciate memes or what he’s saying in the video for that matter. Now, the real magic happens round and about five minutes into the video but try and watch the full 8:47 minutes to get some context.

As Dawkins says: “If you contribute to the world’s culture, through memes, they may live on long intact — long after your genes have dissolved in the common pool.”

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