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Future Tech

  • Scientists can now ‘print’ functional human skin

    Scientists can now 3D print functioning human skin, this according to new research published by a Madrid-based research team. Researchers at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid have developed technology -- effectively a prototype 3D bioprinter -- that can stitch together fully-functioning living tissue. According to the research, the skin is the first living organism to be created using a bioprinter. "This skin can be transplanted to patients or used in business settings to test chemical products, cosmetics or pharmaceutical products in quantities and with timetables and prices that are compatible with these uses," notes researcher José Luis Jorcano in a press release. Jorcano also...

  • F35 fighter jet: 20 issues discovered per month

    The expensive F35 fighter jet programme has been under scrutiny for several years now, as manufacturer Lockheed-Martin, the military and even Donald Trump acknowledge several major issues with the multi-role stealth fighter. Now, an update from the USA's director of operational test and evaluation (via Gizmodo) reveals that there are even more issues with the F35 than previously thought. "Flight sciences testing continues to be a source of significant discovery, another indication that the programme is not nearing completion of development and readiness for IOT&E ," the office reported. "Deficiencies continue to be discovered at a rate...

  • X-Ray vision reveals supermassive blackholes nearby

    Astronomers at the Southampton University have used "X-ray vision" to reveal supermassive blackholes which were hidden behind thick interstellar gas near our galaxy. The discovery was led by PhD researcher Peter Boorman and Dr Poshak Gandhi as well as associate professor Ernest Rutherford. "Every large galaxy in the universe is believed to host a supermassive black hole at their centre, millions of times the mass of our Sun," said Boorman in a press release. "These systems can devour vast quantities of matter due to their extreme gravitational pull, making the black holes grow. The in-falling matter then emits radiation across the full electromagnetic...

  • This 5D imaging technology can digitally scan living tissue

    Researchers from USC Dornsife and USC Viterbi School of Engineering have developed new technology that allows for 5D imaging of animals and human beings. According to the developers, Francesco Cutrale, Prof. Scott Fraser and the late Prof. Elizabeth Garrett, their implementation of 5D imaging -- dubbed Hyper-Spectral Phasor analysis (HySP) -- is cheaper, faster and more accurate than other imaging methods available. 5D imaging technology is useful in detecting important biological molecules, especially signs of disease, being crucial to understanding how diseases interact within a living organism. The HySP uses fluorescent imaging to locate proteins as well as other molecules situated...

  • Watch: SpaceX returns to space with Iridium-1 launch

    SpaceX has successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket, several months after one of its rockets exploded on the launchpad. The rocket was carrying ten communication satellites on Saturday, scheduled to be the first of up to 70 satellites for the Iridium company. In what's quickly becoming a regular part of Falcon 9 missions, the rocket's first stage successfully landed on the barge, called 'Just Read the Instructions'. In fact, the landing was almost perfect, the first stage coming down smoothly and on target. "Mission looks good. Started deploying the 10 Iridium satellites. Rocket is stable on the droneship," Musk tweeted on Saturday, shortly after...

  • Does Trump actually want the F35 programme or not?

    A few weeks ago, US president-elect Donald Trump took to Twitter to blast Lockheed-Martin's F35 fighter jet programme. The programme was slammed for cost overruns and failing to deliver in a few areas, causing Lockheed-Martin's stock to briefly drop. Now, Trump's pick for defense secretary, James Mattis, has said that the president-elect actually supports the programme. According to Defense News, Mattis said Trump just wants "more bang for his buck". "It's not my role to comment on the president-elect's statements except to say that it shows he's serious about getting the best bang for the dollar when it comes to defense dollars, and...

  • Scientists believe the Milky Way is a cosmic thief, home-wrecker

    Scientists at the Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics have determined that half of the 11 furthest known stars in the Milky Way were ripped from another galaxy known as the Sagittarius Dwarf. "The star streams that have been mapped so far are like creeks compared to the giant river of stars we predict will be observed eventually," said the lead author, Marion Dierickx, a graduate student at Harvard University in a press release. According to the research, the Sagittarius Dwarf -- just one of the dozens of mini-galaxies that surrounds our Milky Way -- made its way around our galaxy at a point in...

  • Miss Obama’s final speech? Rewatch it in 360-degrees

    Like saying goodbye to a kid finally leaving for the big wide world, outgoing US President Obama gave his final speech to a nation on the brink of change on Tuesday evening in Chicago. But while it was a momentous occasion for both Obama and the American public, it was also fairly big for emerging technologies. Alongside traditional broadcasts, the speech was the first of a US president to be aired as a 360-degree video on Facebook, Periscope/Twitter and YouTube. Using three of Nokia's OZO camera rigs, virtual reality company VRScout alongside Radiant Images and vantage.tv recorded and beamed the feed...

  • NASA announces two ambitious missions to asteroids

    NASA has just approved two missions to explore asteroids, with the aim of learning more about the early solar system. The two missions, dubbed Lucy and Psyche, are tentatively scheduled to launch in 2021 and 2023 respectively, the space agency announced on its website. "Lucy will visit a target-rich environment of Jupiter's mysterious Trojan asteroids, while Psyche will study a unique metal asteroid that's never been visited before," Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, was quoted as saying. Lucy is slated to launch in October 2021, arriving at a "main belt" asteroid in 2025. From 2027 until 2033, it...

  • Questions raised over Ukraine artillery hacking

    A cybersecurity expert has questioned claims that Russian intelligence hacked Ukrainian artillery units with malware to track their location. Security firm Crowdstrike issued a report last month, finding that malware had infected Ukrainian artillery units who used an application called POPR-D30. The artillery operators used the Android app to calculate firing corrections for the D30 howitzer. Crowdstrike's report found that an infected version of the app was floating around, adding that the infected version was sending the artillery units' location to Russian intelligence. The report added that Russia may have used the malware to get a fix on Ukrainian artillery emplacements and destroy...

  • SpaceX set for return to launch on Sunday?

    SpaceX has been hard at work following the explosion of one of its rockets on the launchpad late last year. Now, the company has revealed the final cause of the explosion, as well as plans to launch on Sunday. The final cause relates to "composite overwrapped pressure vessels" (COPVs) inside the second stage oxygen tank, falling in line with the preliminary findings. These vessels are used to store helium, the private space company noted. "Specifically, the investigation team concluded the failure was likely due to the accumulation of oxygen between the COPV liner and overwrap in a void or a buckle...

  • Now Ukraine’s artillery is affected by malware

    We've already seen malware being used to disrupt power stations and other infrastructure. But a new form of malware has been affecting Ukraine's artillery pieces. According to security firm CrowdStrike, hackers crafted the X-Agent malware into an Android app used by Ukrainian artillery operators. The legitimate version of the app allows operators of the D-30 howitzer to quickly process targeting data, reducing processing time from minutes to "under 15 seconds". And it's seen quite a lot of downloads, with roughly 9000 users, it's been claimed. The malware should be a big concern for militaries around the world The security firm found that X-Agent was able to...

  • Russia tests ‘anti-satellite’ missile

    Russia has conducted a successful test of an anti-satellite missile, it has been reported. According to the Washington Free Beacon, it was the third successful test of the PL-19 Nudol missile out of five tests in total. The missile was launched from a base in central Russia on 16 December and was monitored by the USA, the publication added. According to CNN, US intelligence didn't track any debris, suggesting that a target wasn't destroyed during the test. Russia purportedly says that the missile is intended for defence against ballistic missiles. An anti-satellite missile could wreak havoc on a military's capabilities, targeting communications and spy satellites as well...

  • Donald Trump to cancel F-35 fighter programme?

    US president-elect Donald Trump has slammed numerous companies and people, but defense firms haven't been in his crosshairs too often. However, this week saw Trump slam Lockheed-Martin for the horribly expensive, much delayed F-35 fighter jet programme. "The F-35 program and cost is out of control. Billions of dollars can and will be saved on military (and other) purchases after January 20th," the president-elect tweeted on Monday. The tweet saw Lockheed-Martin's shares dip by over 4% before closing down by 2.47%. The F-35 programme has courted a ton of negative publicity Lockheed Martin's fighter jet has been hit with numerous cost overruns and delays. In...

  • CRISPR cures mice of blood deficiency through gene editing

    One of the world's most powerful genome-editing tools CRISPR is beginning to show just how efficient it can be. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have developed an innovative dual-gene-therapy approach to delivering the editing tool into mice to treat haemophilia B. The disorder is also known as Factor IX Deficiency which is caused by a defective clotting protein. In some cases that protein is missing completely. The research team consisted of associate professor in the Penn Gene Therapy Program, Lili Wang; professor of medicine and GTP director, James M Wilson. The team also consisted of...