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Media 2.0

  • Not just for magazines: why digital publishing is a smart business decision

    Time and money are the two key components of running and maintaining a profitable business. Another factor that’s key to a business’ success is always looking for new and innovative ways to stand out by offering clients business solutions that are savvy and that guarantee them time and money savings. In a digitally-inspired world, engagement is everything, and is something that normal print solutions don’t always offer clients. Digital publishing can be used for various things. The most obvious being to deploy a magazine or other paid-for content. But it can also be used for corporate magazines, marketing communications,...

  • Beyond memes: BuzzFeed gets $50-million from Andresseen Horowitz

    Venture capital firm Andresseen Horowitz has just announced a US$50-million investment in hugely popular media tech company BuzzFeed, tallying up its total valuation at a massive US$850-million. "That's a lot of buck for a lot of memes and listicles," I hear you say. But there's a lot more happening behind the scenes of your Facebook news feed, the trendy internet company will have you know. "The most interesting tech companies aren’t trying to sell software to other companies. They are trying to reshape industries from top to bottom," renowned investor Chris Dixon from Andresseen Horowitz argues, who'll also be...

  • Screw innovation, the New York Times need to focus on TBD

    The New York Times Innovation Report has been ripped to pieces by many brains in the media world but the issues are the familiar TBD framework I work with, namely Technology (can/does it do what is needed?), Behaviour (will people do what we need/want?) and Data (will enough people do what we need?). After ploughing through it, despite a slightly depressing overtone, I am confident the New York Times will pull through...the industry can't afford it not to (read: have an R&D budget). The very fact it is doing a report of this sort (especially considering who asked for...

  • Popcorn Time: what the ‘Netflix you always wanted’ taught us about ourselves

    I think it is pretty safe to say that we have all done it. We have succumbed to the peer pressure of the masses and we have buckled. We have tasted freedom and we liked it. We liked it so much that we want more; now; and forever! I am of course talking about torrenting movies and series -- either illegally; legally or vicariously through a friend-of-a-friend. But we have all done it and we are going to keep on doing it! I find it rather poetic that my PC wants to correct the word “torrented” to “tormented” as that...

  • Nobody killed anybody: the case for radio and video in the internet age

    Death is society's favourite topic. The minute something new comes along, we predict the death of the old because it must be so. No one ever asks if it can adapt or reinvent. Instead it simply must die. This reality has never been truer than in the ever-colliding world of media and television. As the song goes, "video killed the radio star," so the world now must accept that piracy and the internet killed the music video. At least, that's according to former MTV executive, Peter Hoare. In a very interesting post on AskMen.com, Hoare simply articulates that MTV...

  • Magazine mindset undermines tablet opportunity

    The rush by media owners to embrace tablets borders on the unseemly. And who can blame them given the continued decline of print revenue and resistance by folk to pay for content on the internet. Tablets, we are told, are much closer to print magazines than to the free-for-all interwebs. Publishers like tablets because they bring people back into "closed" environments through apps. Closing the circle and getting people to "stick" around on one media property was also the purpose of the mega-portals from the 90s. Pull people in, monopolize their attention, and revenue must follow; the argument went. Of course...

  • The inevitable rise of mainstream media’s saviour: Activist media

    I recently gave a presentation to TEDxSF, looking at the theme of "Designing your own government" -- In it, I examined the role of media, especially around the Occupy Wall Street movement. What strikes me as significant is that the activists can produce lots of great media such as photos, video, articulate blog posts, and tweets. In actual fact, it's a steadily growing archive of media produced by activists. On the establishment side, there is an increasing number of newspaper stories, TV, and radio reports about Occupy Wall Street. But there's a big issue: The establishment media is steadily shrinking, it...

  • Innovation journalism — Media coverage is important to startups

    Media coverage is very important for startups. It is how they gain respect in their community, it is how they can win investors, and it is invaluable in helping to recruit staff. Positive media coverage will also help gain users of their products and services, providing valuable marketing services that could cost tens of thousands of dollars. But the only reason media coverage of a startup and their product is valuable is that the media coverage is seen as a neutral third party -- it has no financial bias in its reporting. The only acceptable bias is a thirst for a great...

  • With The Daily, News Corp and Apple try to shake up the news business model

    Rupert Murdoch is the biggest man in media. Apple is one of the hottest companies in tech. The two have teamed up to make a run at a new kind of news organisation, creating a tablet-only paid product that could reinvent the news subscription model. Called The Daily, Murdoch’s brainchild staffs more than 50 top-tier journalists and will only be available as an iPad app through at least 2012. The News Corp. CEO introduced the product to mixed reviews at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City on Wednesday morning. "New times demand new journalism," he said. ...

  • Online anonymity – what’s the big deal?

    Online anonymity is an issue fraught with emotion. It often inspires passionate arguments from both sides and opens windows into the deeper and darker aspects of our societies. So what, exactly, is the big deal? Firstly, it is important to clarify exactly what online anonymity is. It is very closely related to the issue of personal privacy. While the matter of personal privacy online relates to companies using so called ‘private’ data for advertising profiling purposes (to give one example), personal anonymity relates more to situations that an internet user enters into voluntarily. Whether or not companies should be using...

  • iPad magazines: Not all they’re cut out to be

    The iPad may not be all it is cut out to be for magazine publishers. According to Engadget, iPad magazine numbers have dropped. It indicates that iPad magazines benefited from a novelty factor but that the novelty soon wore off. What's puzzling is that iPad sales have been soaring all year; you would expect a rise in magazine subscriptions just based on the percentage of rising iPad sales. Yet we don't see this...

  • WikiLeaks: A morality tale of the modern media

    It is a captivating story, isn’t it? Julian Assange, the face of WikiLeaks, is now an enemy of some of the most powerful people in the world. This Australian born ex-hacker, questionably accused of sex crimes, is now on the run from Interpol and hiding out in Europe. The recent leak has spread like wildfire over news sources, while its web origin is under constant DDOS attack, at least in part by a hacker known as “The Jester” (@Th3J35t3r). It’s the closest thing, at least in my lifetime, to watching a political psychological thriller occurring in front of the...

  • Tynt: A business built on ‘copy and paste’

    Who would think that there is a business in providing an online copy and paste service? Tynt believes that there is a very large opportunity even though it hasn't yet figured out how best to monetise it. Tynt provides publishers with a way of monitoring how and where content is being shared. A reader highlights some text and pastes it into an email or a blog post and Tynt automatically adds a link to the original content. A dashboard shows publishers what has been copied and where it is being shared. Multiply this simple action across tens of millions of web...

  • ScribbleLive: Live media technologies for real-time newsrooms

    I recently met with Michael de Monte, CEO of Scribble Technologies, based in Toronto, Canada. The company offers a very interesting media technology called ScribbleLive, which is a real-time newsroom allowing publishers to rapidly organize and publish text, audio, and video content as it happens. Several large media companies are using it, such as Thomson Reuters, and Rogers (also an investor). Also, Greenpeace uses the technology. Here are some notes from our meeting: - De...

  • Revenge: A Jason Calacanis-inspired Techcrunch Disruptor?

    American Internet entrepreneur and blogger Jason Calacanis used to be a good friend and business partner with Techcrunch founder, Mike Arrington. Together they launched a conference series but fell out and took different paths. Jemima Kiss at Guardian Unlimited reports: Jason Calacanis: Revenge is a new editorial project to rival TechCrunch "Calacanis claims Arrington froze him out of his chunk of the TechCrunch 50 event, but rather than wage full-on warfare, Calacanis is retaliating by aiming to beat TechCrunch at its own game. Calacanis is launching his own startup editorial project - called Launch - and event as a direct challenge...