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Newspapers

  • Major US title dumps print, goes online only

    US News & World Report, which dropped its weekly format two years ago and went monthly, is now abandoning print entirely for the Web. US News & World Report management announced the move to go digital only in a memo to staff, which was obtained by the Romenesko blog at Poynter Online. The December issue of US News & World Report will be the last print edition of the magazine, long the number three...

  • US newspaper circulation drops five percent, except WSJ

    Average daily US newspaper circulation fell 4.99 percent during the six months ending on September 30 compared with the same period a year ago, the Audit Bureau of Circulations (ABC) said. Average Sunday circulation fell 4.46 percent, the bureau said. While the drop provided another dose of bad news for an industry that has seen a wave of bankruptcies, closures and cutbacks, the decline was not as steep as during the previous reporting period. Average...

  • Who is the most powerful editor in the world?

    Mediaite.com is an online and print analysis site which is exhaustively documenting the relative influence and power of the top-ranking editors in the world. The ranks are calculated based on the print circulation of their associated publications, unique online visitors to the site of their associated publication, online buzz, blogs buzz, and Twitter followers (if applicable — not all editors have a twitter account). An individual might be collectively ranked higher than any of their individual metric rankings, due to Mediaite’s algorithm weighting some metrics more than others. Arguably the whole process is stacked in favour of online versus print. Take a...

  • Ethan Zuckerman on why rich nations dominate news

    Ever wondered why Nigeria gets so little media coverage and why places like Japan enjoy so much more attention from the world’s press? That’s a question that concerned internet intellectual Ethan Zuckerman while he was doing research work at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society. “Japan and Nigeria both have a population of about 130 million people. But if you look at a major newspaper outside of the African continent, you are about eight times as likely to see a story on Japan as you are on Nigeria on any given day,” says Zuckerman who started developing what he...

  • Five ways traditional journalists use Facebook

    Many journalists working for traditional media are reticent about joining the digital revolution, but there is little doubt that social media has helped build a more cohesive and supportive traditional journo community. Here are five ways in which Facebook has bolstered the solidarity of those still working for ‘the old order’: Emotional support In the movies and in real life too, many newsrooms once came custom-fitted with a dingy whiskey-soaked bar across the road where journalists in scruffy old leather jackets would drown their sorrows. In more recent times, with newsrooms cut to the bone and time always in short supply...

  • Oriella Survey: Journalists are working harder, better, faster, longer

    The Oriella PR network, an alliance of 17 communications agencies in 20 countries around the world, has recently concluded its third annual survey of journalists. This year the survey was expanded beyond Western Europe to Eastern Europe, the US and Brazil. More than 770 journalists in 21 countries responded. Here are some key findings: Nearly half of the respondents (46 percent) to this year’s study said they are expected to produce more content than before. One in three (30 percent) are working longer hours. Nearly half (46 percent) said their work has improved as a result of digital and social media – an increase...

  • Newspaper paywalls are freemium business models

    Newspaper paywalls have been criticised by many people in geek communities across the world and also by popular journalism bloggers such as Clay Shirky, Jeff Jarvis and Jay Rosen — but they follow the best practices of “Freemium” business models used by thousands of tech startups. Freemium has been a successful strategy used by many tech companies. Please see: Emergence Capital: Profitable Lessons From Freemium Business Models – SVW. And: Case Studies in...

  • Wake up! You can’t crowdsource everything

    A recent story in AdAge, entitled “The ‘Craigslist Effect’ Spreads to Content as Free Work Fills Supply”, is getting quite a lot of attention. If you’re pathologically allergic to reading any more of these “OMFG! New Media is SOOOOO going to kick Traditional Media’s ASS because now we can totally CROWDSOURCE everything from awesome writers who do it for the LOVE of it” stories, stop reading now and head over to cracked.com for something worthwhile. If you hate these kind of stories so much that you want to wallow in some New Media Hating, read on. In fact, read on anyway;...

  • Move over mobile, what about web apps?

    Apps developers are rushing to mobile en masse yet there is another large market, says Joseph Puopolo, director of marketing at OPENapps, and it’s web site applications. “Web site owners need apps for all sorts of functions, such as ticketing, etc. We are offering a marketplace for such apps and a platform that allows those apps to be used on all types of web sites without requiring special plugins.” OPENapps moves beyond the “widget”...

  • Newspass: Why Google’s paywall plans may just work

    Google has been quietly testing a new paywall system for publishers it is calling “Newspass”. According to Italian newspaper La Repubblica, Google has been piloting the service with publishers in Italy. The search giant will apparently launch “an integrated payment system” allowing users to buy news content with just “one click”. Newspass would allow publishers to use a single infrastructure for Web, mobile and tablet computers to monetise their content. Importantly, La Repubblica reports that consumers will have a single log-in across a multitude of news sites that would be flexible enough to accommodate various kinds of payments, including long-term subscriptions...

  • Saving journalism by paying for impressions not words

    Every year hundreds of journalism graduates enter the market looking for work, and these are bad times to find a job in the newspaper business. Newspapers are seeing falls annually in advertising and subscriber revenues. With most of their content, or at least similar content, available on the web for free, why even bother buying or subscribing to a newspaper these days? It is clear: newspapers are going the way of the Rotary Phone, and they are in desperate need of a new business model. The consequences of the end of the traditional business model, based on 80% advertising...

  • User-generated content: Myths and lessons learnt

    Demotix is a London-based, award-winning “citizen journalism” website and photo agency. The site has around 15 000 members in 190 countries who contribute content on a daily basis. More than 200 media outlets around the world receive their daily feed. One of the founders, Turi Munthe, writes for Memeburn about how the site approaches, manages and makes a business out of user generated content: Most people are passive observers and readers, and most people don’t like creating content. Creating content is difficult. There is nothing wrong with that, but that is the way the world works. People who do create...

  • Ten things newsroom managers need to know about journalism now

    For print newspapers to survive and possibly flourish as digital businesses, some new rules are needed. And they are not necessarily the ones they taught you at journalism school. 1. Stop treating your staff like they work in a factory. Traditionally, newspapers have employed skilled knowledge workers and made them function within rigid hierarchies to produce text on a production line. Right now though, you want your reporters to be interacting with others in the story-building process. You want to be thinking of how to create original stories that can be told in a compelling way online, with sound, video,...

  • The media is dying, long live the media

    Did you know that the first printed books in England would leave a blank rectangle at the beginning of a chapter so that an illuminated capital letter could be written in? It’s a great example of a hybrid publishing system, and we can see the same, although in different forms, as publishers transition to an online model. This example, and other aspects of publishing’s evolution over millennia, can be found in an excellent article based on a presentation by Guardian.co.uk Information Architect Martin Beam: Journalism in the digital age: trends, tools and technologies: “But really it has been the development of the World...

  • The digital revolution and the fight for journalism

    One of the great joys of my annual trip to London as a judge of the CNN Multichoice African Journalist of the year awards, is to catch up on journalism in a capital where it is practiced in its finest form, and to be privileged enough to read the cream of the work from our entire continent. London is the ground zero of newspapers — emphasised by the acres of space given to the coverage of the broadband revolution and what it means for the press, and therefore democracy. I realised this one night while eating at a Thai...