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All posts tagged "great firewall of china"

  • Chinese government wants 5 more Lenovos by 2015

    There’s no doubting that Lenovo is one of the Chinese tech scene’s greatest success stories. The electronics manufacturer is growing fast is set to overtake HP and become the world’s top PC manufacturer fairly soon. Small wonder then that the Chinese government wants another five companies just like it. In a statement released yesterday, the government’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) said that it wanted to have between five and eight Chinese manufacturers with sales of at least ¥100 billion (US$16.1-billion) by 2015. The agency also calls for companies in the country to actively pursue acquisitions and...

  • What would China be like if the Great Firewall came crashing down?

    Everyone knows that China’s internet is censored. There’s the government-run firewall that blocks and interferes with unwanted sites, and then there’s the extensive network of self-censors at all of China’s internet companies who delete content they fear might incur the wrath of the regime. But what if that wasn’t true? What would happen if tomorrow, the “Great Firewall” was torn down and Chinese internet companies were told they no longer needed to censor their content? It’s a fascinating question, and quite an important one. In a recent speech, Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei said that China must open up or die, especially...

  • Is China really set for an online advertising boom?

    China’s has the largest online population on the planet, over 500-million people by most estimates. Add in 300-million people with accounts on its various microblogging sites (called weibos) and you can see why advertisers might be clamouring to go online. That drive for online advertising is only being fuelled by the fact that authorities are placing restrictions on broadcast advertising. According to online research company eMarketer, the Chinese government is making it...

  • China’s weibos pass 300-million user mark

    Months after revealing that its online adult population had gone past the 500-million mark, Chinese state authorities announced that more than 300-million people in the country have microblogging accounts. The microblogs, known as weibos (pronounced wei-bohr), emerged and went from strength to strength after Chinese censors blocked Twitter in 2009. Two of the country’s internet powers, Tencent Holdings and Sina Corporation are the largest weibo providers in the country. Their products integrate...

  • US issues demands to China on ‘Great Firewall’

    Ratcheting up its increasingly stern line with Beijing on trade issues, Washington has added concerns about China’s infamous Great Firewall saying that it may be hurting US companies’ access to Chinese consumers. This concern, amongst others, was put forth in a letter by US Ambassador to the World Trade Organisation (WTO) Michael Punke to his Chinese compatriot. “Some companies based outside of China have faced challenges offering their services to Chinese customers when their...

  • Famed Chinese artist and dissident sends first tweets since arrest

    Following what many had taken to be a regime-imposed silence, famed Chinese artist and dissident Ai Weiwei has returned to Twitter. Ai tweeted for the first time this weekend since his April arrest and subsequent June release on the back of public pressure from a number of international bodies. One of Ai’s bail conditions, upon release from detention, was that he was barred from giving media interviews. At the time of his release he said, “Please understand, however that I cannot accept interviews. I am out on bail for one year, that is all I can say”. Regarding this...

  • Can Chinese microblogging sensation Weibo trump Twitter?

    Chinese online media company Sina Corporation is set to launch an English version of its microblogging site Weibo (pronounced Wei-bohr), and it’s worth seeing how the site stacks up against Twitter, its Western counterpart. China is often berated for the facsimiles it produces of Western technological innovations. It’s no laughing matter. In fact, the Western world can only marvel at the speed and efficiency at which these products are copied, manufactured and then distributed in China &#151 although admittedly the quality is often variable. Whether or not you agree in principle or not is irrelevant. Human progress has been built...

  • Google and the Chinese Phisherman

    It’s like something out of a spy movie: On the 1st of June, Google announced that it had uncovered a “campaign to collect user passwords” that was aimed at the personal Gmail accounts of “senior US government officials, Chinese political activists, officials in several Asian countries (predominantly South Korea), military personnel and journalists.” The origin of these activities? Jinan, China. Google outlined the details of the case in a blog post on Thursday, and offered reassurance to its customers along with tips on how to improve their security online. Google is naturally at pains to point out that its security...

  • Iran’s plan for a second web

    Pop quiz: As an internet user, what is the world’s worst country to live in? China with its Great Firewall comes to mind. Or perhaps Cuba, a country that until the end of Fidel Castro’s reign in 2008 outlawed laptop computers and mobile phones. But it is in fact the Islamic Republic of Iran — a country that is the biggest hellhole of internet censorship on the planet. How bad can it be? Well, in the wake of protests following the disputed presidential election on June 12, 2009, Iranian authorities declared all-out war on internet freedom. Intimidation tactics were employed...

  • Cisco sued: accused of helping China’s Great Firewall

    Much is made of the repressive “Great Firewall of China” that blocks any online information the Chinese government does not want made known to its population. As much is made of China’s economy and how it represents massive business opportunities for Western companies. What has been given less attention, however, is what happens when these two interests intersect. What has recently emerged are disquieting claims that Cisco Systems, the American-based technology multinational, is...

  • US push for smash through the great firewall of China

    The United States plans to pump millions of dollars into new technology to break through internet censorship overseas amid a heightened crackdown on dissent in China, officials have said. US State Department officials said they would give US$19 million to efforts to evade internet controls in China, Iran and other authoritarian states which block online access to politically sensitive material. Michael Posner, the assistant secretary of state in charge of human rights, said...

  • Human rights network releases damning Chinese media report

    A Hong Kong human rights networks says China’s heavily-censored internet is the main battleground in the fight for freedom of expression. The Chinese Human Rights Defenders (CHRD), a network of activists, detailed a litany of rights abuses in its annual report on the events of 2010. Details on the list of acts committed by the state against campaigners include more than 3 500 cases of arbitrary detention and allegations of torture. The network...

  • China’s online anti-government campaigners refuse to back down

    Tough security measures clamping down an online campaign in China have led organisers of the effort to condemn the harsh response of the Chinese state. The so-called “Jasmine rallies” – a reference to the “Jasmine revolution” in Tunisia that sparked unrest across the Arab world – are organised by internet users who say they have support in dozens of Chinese cities. The new statement – posted on Facebook, Twitter and other foreign...

  • Memeburn’s tech losers of 2010: Google, Yahoo, netbooks, paywalls

    Most of the widely publicised failures of the year have happened to the most successful companies — organisations that can easily weather experimental projects or changes. They are able to bounce back, even after massive setbacks because of their “failing forward” approaches: Risk management, PR, and monetary reserves set aside for research and development. They dare to break new ground, and provide valuable insight to entrepreneurs who were mulling similar experimental projects. In part two of our series (read Part one: Tech winners here), we take a look at some of the less successful developments in the tech world during...