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All posts tagged "privacy"

  • Twitter introduces new data dashboard to help you monitor and manage your account

    Twitter, of late, has been beset with problems. First its CEO left and then the rumours that Twitter might be bought reared their ugly head again, affecting its share price. Something is certainly amiss. In the interim, Twitter is getting on with it, dusting itself off, and introducing new features to the platform. The latest one is the Twitter data dashboard, introduced yesterday. The company says that this is a new tool to help users to monitor and manage their accounts. Much of the latest changes by Twitter have been bland and something huge is needed and this, as...

  • Google refreshes, reinforces its user privacy and security settings

    Google has rolled out two improvements to its privacy and security tools in a bid to give users more flexible options. There's now a new hub for managing Google settings called My Account and a new site that answers important questions about privacy and security on Google. My Account also works for those who may not have a Google account. The company says that people feel that they are not in charge of the privacy settings. “Everyday, we make choices that affect our privacy and security online. Most people, however, don’t feel they have the right level of control to make these...

  • Gone baby gone: Google receives 12k ‘removal requests’ in 48 hours

    Privacy settings, a hot-button topic many websites do their best to avoid, get the royal treatment from Google as a new "right to be forgotten" form launched earlier this week for EU Google users. Those who value their secrecy can fill in the form to have results which are "inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant, or excessive in relation to the purposes for which they were processed," removed if and when Google flips the approve switch. Google launched the option late last week and in a single day, more than 12 000 requests were processed, reports news network ABC. The form follows an...

  • More control: Facebook will now let you login to apps anonymously

    Keen to try out new apps, but a bit hesitant about allowing them to use your Facebook details? That may no longer be an issue -- Facebook's making some privacy changes. The social media giant announced at its F8 developer conference that it would be changing how it manages logins from third party apps. Specifically, it's introducing anonymous logins, and giving users more control over what they want to share when they opt to sign up with Facebook instead of creating custom usernames and passwords for every app. Anonymous logins Previously, if you used your Facebook account to access apps like Flipboard...

  • Big data is the superhero for your digital security woes [RSA conf]

    There has never been a more dangerous time to be online: there are threats from every corner and attackers are getting more sophisticated. With data hopping from device to device via the cloud, the way we do security must change. This is the world of big data and where trust and privacy is becoming more vulnerable. Art Coviello the Executive Chairman of RSA (the security division of EMC) believes the way security is currently tackled must change if today's society is to survive the changing world of technology. He argues that the security industry needs a scalable ecosystem for sharing...

  • The future of online privacy? Most of us aren’t all that bothered

    Meabh Quoirin, managing director of Future Foundation closed the annual Future Foundation conference with an in-depth look at where privacy and anonymity on the web are headed to in the next few years. New data presented at the conference suggests that only a vocal few percent of people are significantly worried about privacy. Indeed most are actually happy -- or perhaps nonchalant -- to what data companies and agencies want to have (or target them by). Quoirin went on to talk about recent Pew data that shows how we're hiding some aspects of ourselves from those closest to us, let...

  • Half of top mobile apps don’t offer privacy policies prior to download

    More than a quarter of the top 100 free mobile apps don’t have a privacy policy. That's according to MEF, the global community for mobile content and commerce. With online privacy emerging as a focal issue in the last few months, MEF has published analysis into how the top 100 free mobile apps inform consumers about their use of personal data. More than a quarter (28%) of the top 100 apps available from the App Store and Google Play still don’t have a privacy policy. As well as other areas for improvement, mobile apps can present privacy information in a...

  • Facebook users to vote on whether they get to vote on social network changes

    More than 18 000 people have commented on Facebook's proposed changes to its governing documents. That enough to trigger a vote on the proposed changes. The vote comes into play as the electronic privacy information centre (EPIC), along with other privacy groups, has asked the social network to withdraw some its proposed changes. These include sharing its data with that of Instagram and removing the ability to vote on the proposed changes. When Facebook announced the proposed changes last week, it said it was proposing scrapping the ability for people to vote on the changes, because the voting system...

  • 6 top tips for controlling your privacy on social media

    If you are concerned about your privacy online, social media is inevitably going to throw a couple of hurdles in your path. In its basic form, the social web encourages sharing and broader engagement that can translate to a much looser control over your private interactions and your personal information online. Every day we use our favourite social media channel to communicate, engage, and to maintain our relationships with friends, family, and colleagues. We also use the social web as a source of information when we are looking for answers. Think about it -- social media has been integrated into...

  • Privly: Organise your next coup online, in total privacy

    There's a Kickstarter project I want you to know about. It's called Privly and it's a defiant kick to the face of oppressive governments. The Privly proof of concept works as a browser plugin and will allow you to view and post encrypted content on any website -- Twitter, Facebook, Google+, even Gmail. Let your imagination run wild. Taking Twitter as an example, you write a tweet -- 140 characters or more -- right click and select "Post to Privly." The text of your tweet gets sent to (and stored on) the Privly servers which return a link, for...

  • Privacy vs Social: Cool solutions to help you cope

    I've been advocating a stronger approach to privacy for some time now. My biggest concern is that we share so much private information using social media, that identity theft and other security issues are only just beginning to become apparent. Aside from this, we are caught between the need to take advantage of the social networks that the majority of our peers share and simply giving in to the terms and conditions that come as part and parcel of these services. Most notably, all of the content that you share over a social networking site suddenly becomes transparent to...

  • Rumours of Google’s demise have been greatly exaggerated

    Recently, Eric Jackson at Forbes, wrote an article that suggests that Google and Facebook will struggle to maintain their market dominance as technology increasingly shifts toward mobile computing. Jackson makes the point that many of the companies that started at the birth of the Web (Web 1.0) struggled to survive as social networking (Web 2.0) began to emerge. Now, he thinks that we are entering a new technical phase, where the Web is no longer relevant and mobile is king. While Jackson does make some interesting points, I think he's completely wrong. Not because I think Google and Facebook...

  • They’re watching you: Non-members of social networks are still products

    A few people I know have removed their Facebook profiles, in the interest of gaining back some sense of privacy. In fact, I even know a couple of people who have never signed up to a social network in the first place. Sometimes I envy these people, just because they are taking a stand against a growing phenomenon that is rapidly turning personal data into a commercial product. Still, I have often wondered how much of a difference it makes if you choose not to belong to something as ubiquitous as Facebook or Google+. Now, a group of boffins...

  • Privacy and competition: Interrogating Google

    Google’s been on the chopping block a lot lately with suggestions that it promotes anti-competitive behavior by serving its own self-interest and robbing consumers of alternative search and related services. It seems to be part of a broader move by many governments to ensure that massive digital conglomerates like Google, Apple and Facebook are held accountable for the data they collect each time we switch on a mobile phone or perform an internet search. Do we need specific legislation to protect consumers from the private sector? And if that protection came into effect how far should regulation go? These...

  • 5 Things you should know about Google’s new terms and conditions

    We all know that Google recently updated its terms, conditions and privacy policies. The company argued that the change would ensure that all Google services would be consolidated under one, simple to understand, universal set of conditions, rather than expecting users to navigate a multitude of separate policies for each of their services. Few analysts have been convinced, with many citing that Google is more concerned with turning a profit than protecting user privacy; either way, Google has gone ahead with its changes and, as Memeburn columnist Rowan Puttergill recently wrote, "if Google feels that its applications will function better...