• BURN MEDIA
    • Motorburn
      Because cars are gadgets
    • Gearburn
      Incisive reviews for the gadget obsessed
    • Ventureburn
      Startup news for emerging markets
    • Jobsburn
      Digital industry jobs for the anti 9 to 5!
  • Uber president Jeff Jones quits after nightmarish six months

    Uber president Jeff Jones is leaving the company after just six months on the job. While CEO Travis Kalanick is blaming his search for a COO as the reason Jones quit, the president told Recode that "that the beliefs and approach to leadership that have guided career are inconsistent with what saw and experienced at Uber." Jeff Jones worked as the CMO of retail giant Target before making the move to Uber in October 2016. While he was there, Jones spent a lot of his time talking to drivers to decipher the ride-sharing company's next move. He believed that the...

  • YouTubers fight back as LGBTQ+ content is blocked

    YouTube is blocking LGBTQ+ content in its restricted mode, and content creators aren't pleased. According to the platform, the mode is used to "screen out potentially objectionable content that you may prefer not to see or don't want others in your family to see on YouTube." "We use community flagging, age-restrictions, and other signals to identify and filter out potentially inappropriate content," it writes. Tyler Oakley -- one of YouTube's most popular creators with over eight million subscribers -- was one of the first to pick up on the censorship. until we hear back from @youtube, please actively check on all LGBTQ+ creators you're subscribed...

  • Snapping Dublin’s city lights from space is how NASA celebrated St Patrick’s Day

    Everyone feels just a little bit Irish when St. Patrick's Day comes around. This year, the feast fell on Friday with millions of human beings across the world enjoying festivities with families and friends. But it seems that even NASA's off-world astronauts were getting in on the fun. Astronaut Shane Kimbrough, who is currently residing on the ISS, shared the below snap of Dublin from the space station at night, detailing the city's ring roads, harbour and buzzing city centre. Happy #StPatricksDay Spectacular #Dublin, Ireland captured by @thom_astro from @Space_Station. Enjoy the #StPatricksFest Parade down there! pic.twitter.com/5yKuFyoOUc — Shane Kimbrough (@astro_kimbrough) March 17,...

  • Is it all over for internet banking?

    Have we seen the peak of internet banking in South Africa? Although the banks are quite tight-lipped about their usage numbers, I suspect that the number of customers using a desktop computer to do their banking is declining. We know that the majority of logons come from office workers, but we also know that the number of employed people (including government workers) in South Africa is stagnant. While many up-market homes have a desktop PC or a laptop, and fibre services have been introduced in certain suburbs, the growth rate of fixed broad-band internet (at less than two million connections)...

  • John Wick Chapter 2 movie review: gun-fu at its finest

    This second instalment in the John Wick franchise will have a lot of people questioning the protagonist's motives. John Wick Chapter 2 continues just a few days after the first film when Wick is dragged back into the bloody life he left behind. Rather fittingly this took the form of a blood oath, an oath John made with a "friend" to be able to complete the impossible task that set him free from his life as an assassin. The antagonist confronts Wick to cash in this oath and, according to the assassins network known as the "Continental, an oath can never be denied. Compared to...

  • ‘South Africa’s dumbest criminals’ go viral, social media gets racist

    Three Johannesburg men found viral fame when they attempted to break into a house while the homeowner stood filming them. The men are oblivious to the fact they've been caught and continue to pry open the gate with a crowbar until the Orange Grove homeowner clears his throat. The men, confused and unsure of what to do, look at each other before walking slowly away from the gate. The video posted by TimesLIVE on YouTube has garnered 76 000 views in just over a day, alongside the original posting on Facebook that has picked up near on 30, 000. It has been shared...

  • The Bookmarks 2017: here are the winners

    In case you weren't anywhere near Twitter or Sandton last night, the 2017 and ninth edition of The Bookmarks took place last night. The IAB Bookmark Awards (as it is more formally known) is known in the digital industry for "rewarding excellence in digital and recognising the powerful impact interactive has on the overall marketing mix". You could call it the SAMAs of the digital industry. "South Africa’s top talent and most memorable campaigns were recognised, illustrating how far the digital industry has come and laying the path for future innovation," IAB writes in a press release. So, who won? Memeburn and Creative Spark...

  • YouTube is killing annotations, and the community isn’t well pleased

    Thanks to internet users' gradual but constant move to mobile, YouTube is killing its video annotations editing tool. The tool, which launched in 2008, allowed users to "layer text, links, and hotspots over your video. They help you enrich the video experience by adding information, interactivity and engagement," YouTube writes in its Help section. But the company feels there just isn't any place for the tool in 2017, with more than 60% of the company's watchtime residing on mobile devices. "Effective starting May 2, you'll no longer be able to add new or edit existing annotations, only delete them. Existing annotations will...

  • Facebook struggling to get live TV you’d want to watch

    Facebook has been working very hard to establish itself as an inevitable competitor in the TV industry. Last month, the company hired former MTV executive Mina Lefevre as Head of Development. Before that, the company made it clear they were placing a greater emphasis on longer videos, and has even paid media outlets like Buzzfeed and The New York Times to use the live feature. But, unlike YouTube TV, Facebook have not managed to acquire access to what people actually care about: popular content. So far, the company has cracked streaming deals with US Major League Soccer and World Surf League -- hardly anything the...

  • Weekly Round Up Podcast #99: social media rage, Nintendo Switch & more

    Welcome to Weekly Roundup, our podcast discussing the latest tech trends, innovation and news from the last few days. This time, the Hadlee Simons once again plays host to the full team: Andy Walker, Graham van der Made and Julia Breakey. The team discuss the numerous instances of social media rage this week, including a number of tweets from Western Cape premier Helen Zille, and a recent hacking scandal involving Twitter, Turkey, the Netherlands and swastikas. We also discuss the booming Nintendo Switch sales figures, and we also take a look at the new PlayStation 4 system software update and how it...

  • Netflix replaces star ratings with thumbs, because we’re simple creatures

    I know the biggest issue I've ever faced while binging Black Mirror was extending my brain too far when considering if the episode in which a prime minister is asked to have intimate relations with a pig should get a four or five star rating. I don't use Netflix to think -- and they've finally acknowledged it. The streaming service has announced that it's ditching the star rating system in favour of a YouTube-like thumbs up or down button. As of April, when you're pouring the last of your chips into your mouth, you only need to acknowledge your base emotional response. Nuance be damned. According...

  • How will quashing fake news impact your business on social?

    In January 2017, Facebook introduced The Journalism Project. Based on a 2016 study from the Pew Research Center, the introduction of such an initiative was overdue. Of those who responded to the question of trust in social media as a news source, only 4% of web-using U.S. adults trusted the information they get from social media “a lot”, while 30% of respondents trusted social platforms “some”. Notwithstanding this lack of trust, reports suggest that the speed at which fake news spreads across social platforms is alarming. BuzzFeed’s Craig Silverman compiled the following chart to highlight the effect: The allegations that social...

  • Google moves to demote offensive search results

    Google has launched an effort to flag and demote "upsetting-offensive" results on its search engine. According to Search Engine Land, the company employs 10 000 human quality raters to help rank its results -- and a new guideline has been added that allows for the flagging of content that is blatantly untrue. Senior engineer Paul Haahr told the publication that Google was avoiding the vague term "fake news," and was instead looking for results that featured "demonstrably inaccurate information". Quality raters' jobs entail searching real queries Google has seen and ranking the results based on a 200-page set of guidelines. The "upsetting-offensive" section has recently been added to...

  • Helen Zille infuriates Twitter after defending colonialism

    Helen Zille may have been on Twitter for a while, but she still hasn't acquired the skill of knowing when to put the phone down and go back to bed. On Thursday morning, the Premier of the Western Cape took to Twitter to let everyone know that not everything about colonialism was bad. For those claiming legacy of colonialism was ONLY negative, think of our independent judiciary, transport infrastructure, piped water etc. — Helen Zille (@helenzille) March 16, 2017 Zille has been in politics a long time. She surely understands the dangers of professing that west is best. She could also do a quick...

  • WhatsApp flaw lets hackers take over accounts in seconds

    WhatsApp and Telegram's online platforms had a bug that allowed hackers to take full control of anyone's account by sending a simple image to a user. Check Point Software researchers revealed in a blog post yesterday that if hackers had exploited the hack, they would have been in control of all the victims' conversations, photos, files and contact lists. "This means that attackers could potentially download your photos and or post them online, send messages on your behalf, demand ransom, and even take over your friends’ accounts," the blog reads. According to Check Point, the source of the issue was the end-to-end encryption...