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Inventor of ‘On Fleek’ Peaches Monroee seeks royalties

peaches monroee on fleek

Vine user Peaches Monroee shot to fame with the vine that changed the course of the English language.

If you’ve ever used the phrase “on fleek” you have her to thank for it — and now she wants you to pay up.

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Monroee has set up a gofundme to raise money for a cosmetic and hair line she wishes to start. As a nursing student, she doesn’t have the funds to get them going herself, and is asking for the money she “deserves” to make.

“Everyone has used the phrase/word but I haven’t received any money behind it or recognition,” she writes.

While it may seem ridiculous — you can’t charge someone for speaking, after all — it is important to remember how much money people are making off of her popular phrase.

If you’ve ever used the phrase “on fleek” you have Peaches Monroee to thank for it

On Etsy, there are hundreds of handmade goods that display the words “on fleek.” A single necklace adorning the phrase could cost you US$70 a pop.

On Amazon, you’ll find 20 pages of lipsticks, tweezers, phone cases, mugs and more of products making money off of Monroee’s phrase.

And while you may disagree that words can become intellectual property, now might be the time to remind you of the Taylor Swift debacle of 2015.

When Swift’s 1989 album took off, the singer trademarked many of her lyrics, including the phrases “this sick beat” and “party like it’s 1989” — words that, unlike “on fleek,” many had used before her.

Monroee has so far made US$8000 from her campaign, and has her goal set at US$100 000.

Here’s hoping Shakespeare’s estate doesn’t start coming for us too, or there’ll an outbreak of groveling.

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