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All posts tagged "Techcrunch"

  • Would you pay $2 to promote your Facebook status?

    Are you afraid all your friends on Facebook will miss out on your latest status update? You know, because it's super-important? Well fret no more. The social networking giant is reportedly testing out a system that lets people pay US$2 to promote their status updates above everyone else's. At the moment, the feature is only available to a select group of ordinary users. What it's effectively doing is monetising is popularity --...

  • Women in tech: Leading the geek world one stiletto at a time

    It seems no matter how much society evolves, women are always left just that little bit behind. No, this is not an article about gender equality -- this is a tech site for crying out loud. As Google's Marissa Mayer recently wrote about IBM CEO Virginia Rometty for her inclusion in TIME magazine's 100 most influential people of 2012, "women in the workplace and women in technology will be key drivers of global competitiveness and innovation in the future." Interestingly, Rometty and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg are the only two tech company heads on the list which included 38...

  • CNN to buy Mashable for $200-million [Rumour]

    Rumour has it that international news giant CNN is in possible talks to buy popular tech news site Mashable for upwards of US$200-million. The rumour comes courtesy of Reuters reporter Felix Salmon, who said a "little bird" informed him of the possible purchase. According to Salmon, citing unnamed sources, the announcement should come as early as Tuesday. CNN seems to be following AOL's acquisition trail. The news giant already acquired iPad magazine publisher Zite...

  • Why being a Linux geek could make you more employable

    I love Linux and I have been fortunate enough to have been able to use it as my base operating system in all of the different companies that I've worked for the last ten years or so. But, I know that unless you're a systems administrator, most fans of the OS find themselves battling against corporate IT if they even try to run a non-Windows system at work. Just recently, I noticed a post on Slashdot where a user was asking where he could get a job in the FOSS industry. So, I was quite relieved to see that...

  • New York VC invests in Fine Art startup

    A New York-based early-stage VC fund called Founder Collective is taking an unusual bet on a niche online market: Fine Art. According to TechCrunch, the company is investing a cool US$4-million in Paddle8 -- an online marketplace that aims to provide people “With new access points to premier artworks”. Founder Collective is reportedly no stranger to investing in niche tech markets, having previously put capital into luxury vehicle hire app Uber and...

  • The ‘Golden Age’ of tech blogging is over? I don’t think so

    Given that the week between Christmas and New Year's Day is usually very slow in the tech blogging world, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that Jeremiah Owyang’s linkbait post about the end of the “Golden Age of Tech Blogging” got its fair share of attention when it came out. My old boss Marshall Kirkpatrick and former TechCrunch writer Sarah Lacy already wrote some pretty good rebuttals of Owyang’s ideas, but I...

  • Google+ draws Gmail, Contacts into its circle

    Google is integrating features of its nascent social effort, Google+, into Gmail and contacts. The new features allow people to grow their circles, filter emails and contacts by circles, keep all their contact information up-to-date automatically and share photos to Google+, all from within Gmail. The new features are embedded right in the heart of the Gmail experience. According to Google, every time you open an email from someone “you can see the...

  • Michael Arrington, ‘unpaid blogger’ launches Uncrunched

    TechCrunch founder and former editor-in-chief Michael Arrington has launched a new blog. The site, called Uncrunched, recently went live with a solely user-generated post entitled “Here I am”. The post generated some 503 comments. Following this, however, a second post was put up explaining exactly what Arrington aims to do with Uncrunched now that he is, to quote the T-Shirt he wore at the recent Disrupt conference, an "unpaid blogger". The answer, it would seem, is pretty much the exact same thing he was doing with TechCrunch but without the corporate bulk of AOL breathing down his neck: I'm going...

  • AOL names new TechCrunch editor

    AOL has named Erick Schonfield as the new editor of popular US technology blog TechCrunch. The announcement puts an end to days of controversy and uncertainty around the fate of site founder Michael Arrington. Much of the controversy arose after Arrington announced that he would be launching a US$20-million Venture Capital fund called CrunchFund. The fund would back some of the startups TechCrunch had previously written about. A number of commentators, however, felt that this represented a breach of journalistic ethics and a violation of AOL's own policy. Despite overwhelming support from his staff, Arrington has agreed to "move...

  • The BBM debate: Can speech ever be consequence free?

    The latest call to intercept messages on the Blackberry Messenger (BBM) platform, by South African Deputy-Communications minister, Obed Bapela, threw the veritable cat amongst the pigeons with regard to freedom of speech and privacy. This call resonated globally, with TechCrunch and other media houses worldwide commenting on the statement. South Africa's own level-headed communications minister Roy Padayachie was quick to clear the air. He has stated categorically that there is no current plan to intercept or regulate BBM specifically, but did add rather ominously, that the government was still drafting a policy statement that "will review current regulatory and...

  • Making AOL look foolish: Arrington continues to post on TechCrunch

    It is becoming increasingly clear that Mike Arrington lost his job at TechCrunch over his insistence to be an investor in his beat companies. Precisely what future he will have with the company, though, remains unclear. Arrington continues to post articles on Techcrunch in defiance of AOL's and Arianna Huffington's statements that he is no longer employed and that Erick Schonfeld is interim editor while a replacement is found. The decision to remove Arrington from an editorial position at TechCrunch was reportedly made by Arianna Huffington, founder of The Huffington Post, which AOL bought in February. Huffington was named the head of...

  • TechCrunch ‘on the precipice’

    In the wake of reports that founding editor Michael Arrington would be resigning, senior TechCrunch blogger MG Siegler believes the renowned blog may be "on the precipice". When it was first revealed that Arrington would be leaving the company he helped found to set up a venture capital fund, it was believed that the decision was an amicable one with the added bonus of a US$10-million cash injection from TechCrunch parent company AOL. Siegler's dramatic post, which appeared as the lead on the site, suggests that the situation may not be so cut and dry: As soon as tomorrow,...

  • TechCrunch’s Arrington resigns to start VC fund

    TechCrunch's Michael Arrington has left the popular blog to start a venture capital fund aimed at investing in tech startups. Arrington has partnered with TechCrunch's parent company AOL to raise US$20-million for the new company, CrunchFund, with AOL investing a reported US$10-million in the venture. According to The Wall Street Journal, the project is also backed by "several" other "venture-capital firms". Arrington gave forewarning of such a move back in April of this year, stating that "in a few months, there's a very good chance that I'll be a direct or indirect investor in a lot of the new startups...

  • Myspace is in a pretty bad space at the moment

    We know now that the Myspace empire has gone bad. It hasn’t busted, but it’s come damn close. And if history teaches us any lessons about empires, it is that they are neither immutable nor invulnerable. In figures alone, Myspace acutely instantiates this truth: in 2007, it was valued as high as US$12-billion; today, it’s just been sold to Specific Media for US$35-million. Ouch. Back in 2005, Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp acquired Myspace for US$580-million. At the time, Myspace’s ascent on the social media-sharing platform seemed unmatchable. Facebook was still in its infancy, and Twitter was just a bricolage...

  • More on Techcrunch editor’s ‘conflict of interest’ disclosure

    There is a widespread perception within the Silicon Valley community, that when it comes to the media, as long as everything is disclosed about potential reporting biases, then it's OK. That seems to be why some have defended Mike Arrington, Editor of the influential Techcrunch publication, when he disclosed last week his investments in startups, and said it did create "conflicts of interests". Some praised his disclosure, saying that as long as his financial biases are disclosed then that's OK. However, Arrington has failed to meet even these minimal levels of ethical behaviour. He admitted that he has been making investments for "several...