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All posts by Kimberley Myers

Kimberley Myers is a passionate writer obsessed with social media and current affairs. After completing a Bachelor of Arts in English, Media & Writing and Film Studies from the University of Cape Town in 2010, she quickly made her jump into the real work to learn from experience. She now works with as a copywriter for a company called CKNet (Cyberkinetics) in Johannesburg. Her final year dissertation investigated Julius Malema's tenders, a thesis which she completed with UCT while studying part time with the Writer's Bureau in London. In her free time Kimberley plays the cello and piano, runs for fun, and knows what is trending on twitter at any given time.
  • Is your business contributing to the tacky manhandling of social media?

    We have been using social networking platforms for over a decade now, and even though the novelty of the concept wore off years ago, social media is still one the most powerful platforms out there. Despite reaching new heights on an almost monthly basis, there is a very real danger that Facebook accounts will start to be deactivated and Twitter profiles closed by their owners: arguably, social media is reaching an all-time low. There are over 500-million Twitter users and one-billion Facebook users; huge numbers which not only show the global nod of approval for these social platforms but which...

  • SOPA: Why YouTube fans need to be worried about America’s piracy bill

    Americans are currently up in arms over the Stop Online Piracy Act, making its way through the United States’ government. And if you’re not in the US and think SOPA is something that’s happening far away and won’t affect you, think again. If passed into law, our lives online will be very different. In short, SOPA is attracting attention due to its broad nature. As the internet is so vast, there’s no knowing where the line is. If passed, the act will give the United States Attorney General the ability to close down websites which infringe copyrights, as...

  • Facebook, Wikileaks and the Protection of Information Bill

    The people of South Africa recently united to watch a turning point in their country’s democratic history — the passing of the Protection of Information Bill by Parliament — perhaps the gravest offence the democracy has seen in all its seventeen years. Those of us opposing the bill dubbed it “Black Tuesday”, wearing black in protest and encouraging others to join us in the hopes that the MPs would wake up to...