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All posts by Edward Love

Born and raised in Cape Town, Edward is a keen writer with sights set on screenwriting. He enjoys reviewing videogames, gadgetry and film, and holds a particular affection for Batman. When not being a nerd, he’s a keen squash player and an ardent Proteas supporter – despite the heartache.
  • Alcatel One Touch Pixi review: cheap, cheery and useful

    There’s something refreshing about the Alcatel One Touch Pixi. It’s a feature-rich phone that packs a great deal into its small frame, and by skimping on bells and whistles, it costs about as much as a trip to the supermarket. Indeed, at R550, this is one of the best value buys I can remember reviewing. There’s definitely a market for this sort of smartphone too. I can imagine an elderly grandparent – one who’s scared of spending money on technology (ooh, what a dirty word) – finding the Pixi a delight, and since it runs on Android v2.3 (Gingerbread), it’s...

  • Hisense HS-X1 review: a smartphone you might as well call a tablet

    Whenever I'm called to pick up a new phone for review, I expect to find something small, economical and light. These are, after all, fairly standard smartphone traits. Not so this time. The Hisense X1 is enormous. Picking it up for the first time, I asked a question that I would soon get from other people time and time again. "Is this really a phone?" Indeed, with a 6.8" screen, the X1 looks more like a tablet. Though Hisense describes it as a phone, it’s so large you can call it what you like: a tablet, a phone or a...

  • ‘Alien Isolation’ preview: prepare for fear

    The release of Ridley Scott’s Alien in 1979 was a major moment in the history of cinema. It was the artisan’s horror film. A beautifully crafted work of art that managed to make science fiction credible in the eyes of the moviegoing public. Hollywood sniffed a goldmine and soon several more films were hatched from its nest. But these later incarnations diverged from the original by preferring bombast over subtlety. The scripts were suddenly accommodating gun-toting mercenaries, hives of aliens and high-powered guns like the pulse rifle, which became a staple of the spinoff videogames bearing the Alien name. In...

  • Thief review: pilfered problems

    When the original Thief arrived on PCs in 1998 it was something of a revelation. Understated yet involved, quiet yet resonant, you were Garrett the master thief. The world you explored was oozing in atmosphere and informed by rich mythology. You had water arrows to extinguish flickering candelight from afar, moss arrows to quieten your step and a sword lest you came face to face with a guard. It was simply made, but beautifully conceived, and the onus was on you to find the right path and execute your plan. Yet two sequels later, both Looking Glass and the franchise...

  • ‘Wolfenstein: New Order’ preview: old-school thrills

    Back in the 1990s, Wolfenstein was king. It was the first true first-person shooter of its time and placed you in the shoes of American hero B.J. Blazkowicz during the height of World War II. Between you and the hundreds of Nazis you slayed was the ultimate prize of all: the death of the Führer himself. Many, many moons later, Wolfenstein feels awfully dated – and understandably so. Still, while there have been several attempts to reboot the series since, no developer has quite been able to capture the essence of the original while still giving the formula a modern...

  • 10 unforgettable Dark Souls moments (and how to beat them)

    Anyone who has played Dark Souls and has been lured in by its charms knows this is not a game you play half-heartedly. Once it sinks its tendrils into you, there’s no escaping the addiction. And why would you want to leave? This is a world stuffed with memorable moments. Lordran is a bedevilling place with dark catacombs, rat-infested sewers, abandoned towns, lush gardens, knightly towers and gladiatorial battlegrounds. Every new location offers something new. The only constant is that you will die – again and again and again. Let’s look back at some of the unforgettable memories that...

  • Why 2014 is the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3’s best year

    The PlayStation 4 and Xbox One are shiny and new, but that doesn’t mean you should run out and buy them right away. No, there’s still a lot of life to glean from the old PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360. In fact, if you’re new to consoles altogether, there are compelling reasons why you should go for one of these older consoles instead of forking out considerably more for their successors. Outside of the games, the differences between the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 are largely negligible, but there are a few worth mentioning. First, here is what the PS3 has...

  • Do we even need Steam Machines?

    While the world continues to mourn the lack of information on Half-Life 3, Valve has decided that it hasn't quite finished playing with our hearts. Though it's decreed 2014 a big year for gamers, it’s not quite for the reasons we’d hoped (read: more Half-Life). No, Valve has instead unveiled a machine that combines the power of the traditional PC with the portability of the everyday console. Except Valve isn't going to make it -- at least not entirely. So let’s get this straight. Valve is readying the Steam Machine, a console that works on its proprietary Steam operating system....

  • Assassin’s Creed 4: Black Flag review — sails into familiar waters

    The Assassins Guild, it seems, was everywhere. Its members, clad in customary hooded garb, prowled Jerusalem during the Third Crusade, made merry in fifteenth-century Florence and even helped George Washington on the frontlines of the American Revolution. It turns out they were pirates too. Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag is the fifth major release in five years and the thirteenth entry in the franchise. Read that again – thirteenth. Ubisoft has made it clear that as long as there’s a historical period to pillage, a story with an assassin can -- and will -- be made to fit. The problem with...

  • FIFA 14 vs PES 2014: a midfield clash

    Football, eh. It’s the people’s game. Simplicity incarnate, you need only a spherical ball and a couple of goalposts to play. But what if you’re more of an armchair football aficionado? What if you’re someone who prefers wiggling thumbsticks to kicking a ball around, but still wants to act out the beautiful game? You really only have two choices: EA’s Fifa series or Konami’s Pro Evolution Soccer. In recent years the choice has been easy. Fifa has always had glitz and glamour, but by borrowing gameplay ideas from its rival it’s become more realistic too, making it the all-round choice. Read...

  • GTA V review: a brilliant, addictive, cohesive open-world game

    You can take a breath. It’s been worth the wait. Grand Theft Auto V is brilliant. Just how brilliant is a matter of subjective opinion, of course. I’d go as far as to say it’s as good as anyone could ever have imagined and every bit as good as the trailers painted it to be -- no wait, that’s wrong. It’s better than the trailers had us believe because we can finally play it. You see, this is a game you need to experience first-hand. Read more on Gearburn.

  • We pay tribute to the 5 best GTA games so far

    With Grand Theft Auto V less than a week away (yes, less than a week away!), we decided to take a look back at the five best entries in this beloved franchise. Sound off in the comments section below if you agree or, inevitably, disagree with our choices. Grand Theft Auto III (2001) Welcome to the birth of Grand Theft Auto in three dimensions. Before 2001, Rockstar’s crime caper had taken place from a bird’s eye view, but Grand Theft Auto III changed all that. It was an experience that had to be seen first-hand to be believed; a game that...

  • Saints Row IV review: sandbox lunacy comes full circle

    In Saints Row IV, the series comes full circle. What started out as a GTA clone has mushroomed into something utterly bonkers. All pretence has disappeared and any veneer of respectability has been yanked away, replaced instead by farce, lunacy and lashings of self referential wit. Saints Row IV isn't content to merely be another sandbox game. It distances itself from the competition while at the same time drawing attention to a litany of pop culture influences. We have Keith David playing… Keith David, a dubstep gun, superpowers, and a number of missions that overtly mock films and games of...

  • Dissecting the ‘Grand Theft Auto Online’ trailer: utterly thrilling

    Do you fancy roaming a massive sandbox and getting up to mischief with your friends at your side? With Grand Theft Auto Online, you can. Released at 4pm (South African time) yesterday, Rockstar’s latest gameplay trailer shows off what you can expect to find in GTA V’s multiplayer offering come 17 September. It picks up right where the single player trailer ended, depicting a sumptuous fighter jet arcing through the late-afternoon sky. The same narrator takes you by the hand and leads you the through the footage, imparting -- albeit in broad brush strokes -- information, and teasing a great deal more. Read more...

  • 12 of the most astonishingly beautiful games of all time

    What makes a game beautiful? Is it the art, the sound, the gameplay or the character design? Maybe it's all of the above, but it takes an almost magical combination of all of the above to create a truly beautiful game. Some games stand out on their own though, as pure art dripped straight from the masters paintbrush. These games represent beauty in the digital form and below, I've chosen 12 that make our eyeballs scream "more!" Read more on Gearburn.