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All posts tagged "Online journalism"

  • How fake press releases could kill SEO for real press releases

    SearchEngineLand has a very good, long look at the recent fake press release announcing Google's US$400-million acquisition of Wi-Fi company ICOA. PRWeb distributed the press release and said it slipped through its internal tests for "integrity." Danny Sullivan explains how PRWeb has become a popular distribution network for a lot of content, some of it shady, and how it ends up on well-respected newspaper sites: In the past, you'd get a press release out and hope newspapers might pick up the story, often using the release as a basis for writing their own stories -- ones that might be fact-checked, or sourced...

  • Why the French media ban on Facebook and Twitter is just plain silly

    Have you ever wondered why media businesses across the world advertise that blue Facebook "F" and the turquoise Twitter "T" and demand nothing in return? These are businesses that make their money from advertising other company's brands, and here they are prominently advertising Facebook and Twitter, for free. Maybe there is a tacit understanding of a certain quid pro quo, because these very social networks pass back a tremendous amount of traffic to news sites as users relentlessly share and tweet articles? It's all rather fuzzy and unmeasurable and one gets the feeling we're still trying to define what it...

  • Survey: Journalists criticise blogs and social media

    A survey of nearly 500 journalists across 15 countries has found that some journalists use social media and blogs to source and verify stories. But the majority don't. Nearly half of respondents (47 percent) said they used Twitter to source new story angles. Over a third said they used Facebook (35 percent). Blogs were also highlighted as a key element of this process with 30 percent saying they used blogs they were familiar with, while 42 percent also drew from blogs they had not visited before. However, the study also validated the continued importance of the PR representative with nearly...

  • Getting from the vital few to the viral many: Social media hype or hope?

    Why are some people conservative and some liberal? Is there a connection between political perspective and intelligence, as new ‘evidence’ seems to suggest? And why do some kids seem to come out the womb extroverted while others are markedly more serious and shy by age two? And why, related to all this, in a digital age when everyone can be a reporter, news photographer, pundit, wiki contributor, twittering observer of the passing parade, do only a tiny minority of people participate in media creation? Clearly there is more and more participation by more and more people in the creation of media,...

  • Wake up! You can’t crowdsource everything

    A recent story in AdAge, entitled "The 'Craigslist Effect’ Spreads to Content as Free Work Fills Supply”, is getting quite a lot of attention. If you’re pathologically allergic to reading any more of these “OMFG! New Media is SOOOOO going to kick Traditional Media’s ASS because now we can totally CROWDSOURCE everything from awesome writers who do it for the LOVE of it” stories, stop reading now and head over to cracked.com for something worthwhile. If you hate these kind of stories so much that you want to wallow in some New Media Hating, read on. In fact, read on anyway;...

  • Saving journalism by paying for impressions not words

    Every year hundreds of journalism graduates enter the market looking for work, and these are bad times to find a job in the newspaper business. Newspapers are seeing falls annually in advertising and subscriber revenues. With most of their content, or at least similar content, available on the web for free, why even bother buying or subscribing to a newspaper these days? It is clear: newspapers are going the way of the Rotary Phone, and they are in desperate need of a new business model. The consequences of the end of the traditional business model, based on 80% advertising...

  • Ten things newsroom managers need to know about journalism now

    For print newspapers to survive and possibly flourish as digital businesses, some new rules are needed. And they are not necessarily the ones they taught you at journalism school. 1. Stop treating your staff like they work in a factory. Traditionally, newspapers have employed skilled knowledge workers and made them function within rigid hierarchies to produce text on a production line. Right now though, you want your reporters to be interacting with others in the story-building process. You want to be thinking of how to create original stories that can be told in a compelling way online, with sound, video,...

  • Why News Roulette is such a great idea

    Just as Nick was about to pull the trigger in the final, deadly game of Russian Roulette in the 'Deer Hunter', the tape in the video machine ran out. As I now know (thanks to the internet), playing time is no indicator of recording time: there was no way the E180 tape would be nearly long enough for the 182-minute long movie. But it’s 2010 now and thank God everything has changed. Instead of Russian Roulette, we have Chatroulette and, even more recently, News Roulette. There’s something about each of these which perfectly captures what we’re doing online these days....

  • Learning from the Telegraph

    On May 24 1844 Samuel Morse sent his message over a copper wire from Baltimore to Washington. The telegraph was the starting point of what could be called the first media revolution. Newspapers were afraid they'd lose subscribers to the new messenger. Why would you read a newspaper when a telegram was faster, the press reasoned. Revolutions never go fast, and it took some time before Reuters stopped feeding the pigeons and started the wire service. Reuters became popular, but the service did not kill newspapers. On the contrary, newspapers became the most important clients of the news wires and...

  • Citizen journalism to shake up SA?

    After landing a job as the Citizen Journalism Trainer at Grocott’s Mail, I sat down to do some research on the subject. So I Googled “citizen journalism” and “citizen journalism training”, and eventually “citizen journalism south africa” – the fifth entry looked interesting: "Will citizen journalism shake up SA media?", an article from the Mail & Guardian. Click. Scroll. WHAT?! Under the headline it reads: “ELVIRA VAN NOORT | JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA - Jan 06 2006 17:25”… Whoa! I forgot I wrote that! The article is about Reporter.co.za, a citizen journalism initiative from Johnnic. Back in 2006 their idea was...

  • Reinventing the @NewsCycle #Eugene

    The murder of South African white supremacist Eugene Terre’Blanche early on Saturday evening is arguably one of the biggest news events in South Africa this year, and once again, traditional news outlets were beaten to the punch by Twitter and the blogosphere. Terre’Blanche was allegedly slain by two of his farm employees following a wage dispute the preceding afternoon. His death comes in the wake of litigation against ANCYL President Julius Malema by Afrikaner lobbying groups aiming to ban him from singing an apartheid struggle song with the lyrics “shoot the boer/shoot shoot”. While there were mixed reports as to who...

  • Who paid the town crier?

    I heard the death knells three years ago. I was a regular features contributor to The Scotsman, the Scottish daily newspaper. I’d written an original colour feature which they’d splashed across the front cover, and I wanted to claim £50 for a train ticket. They told me it was no longer their policy to pay expenses for freelancers. In short: they could no longer afford it. The nuclear explosion of free news content, classifieds and jobs adverts on the internet had lured newspaper’s traditional readers online and left newspapers and their economic backbone -advertising - without an audience. The advertisers withdrew....

  • Don’t build a pay-wall laager; just do a deal with the plumbers

    Take a gathering of the retired editors in February 2010. They’re putting their greying heads together to judge this year’s Mondi Shanduka Newspaper Journalism Awards. They are veterans of maybe 500 years spent in newspapers, and they’re celebrating the contribution of their industry to society. Stories that sizzle. Like surprising Shabir Shaik at the shops, when he’s supposed to be on his death bed. Uncovering an epidemic of bullying at larney Jo’burg schools. Fat cats milking Land Bank funds intended for emerging farmers. A new government pledged to the poor – and its ministers pandering to privilege by acquiring top range...

  • Twitter, journalism and Iran

    Some questions I answered for a newspaper article on journalism and social media, specifically with regard to the Iran uprisings and the use of twitter: 1. Twitter is being used quite extensively at the moment in Iran. Could this be regarded as some kind of turning point for social media? I wouldn't call it a turning point. It's part of an ongoing trend that sees technology and the internet making media and broadcasting more...

  • Key blogs about innovation, media & biz online

    When it comes to news about internet startups, web trends and innovations, blogs are a way better source than traditional media. If you want to know what’s happening on the web, there are some key blogs that should form part of your daily reading. Most serious online fundis use at least 2 or 3 of the blogs below on a regular basis. They are a great indication of online trends and...