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All posts by Andy Walker: Editor

Andy Walker: Editor
Camper by day, run-and-gunner by night, Andy prefers his toast like his coffee -- dark and crunchy. Specialising in spotting the next big Instagram cat star, Andy also dabbles in smartphone and game reviews over on Gearburn.
  • Viral video proves there are still leopards around Cape Town [update]

    Update, 30 March: CapeNature this week announced that the social media-famous leopard was "translocated to natural environment". "A leopard that was recently seen approaching a vehicle in Gordon’s Bay has been safely rehomed in a natural environment within the Western Cape," the organisation writes. "On Monday 27 March, 2017 the animal was coincidentally caught on a smallholding near Gordon’s Bay in a cage trap legally set for feral dogs and caracal. The Cape Leopard Trust (CLT) was able to identify it as the same leopard that was seen in the video, as well as in other previous encounters in the...

  • Periscope live streams will now feature YouTube-like ads

    After news broke this week that Twitter is mulling a possible paid tier of TweetDeck, the company this week announced a new advertising format for Periscope. The social network will begin to show pre-roll advertisements on the live broadcasting service videos similar to YouTube's pre-video ads. This means that users wanting to watch a clip on Twitter's video streaming service will need to sit through an advertisement first. "Today, we’re introducing a new opportunity for publishers and creators to monetize their content, and for brands to advertise against it, with pre-roll ads on Periscope video within Twitter," the company announced. "Pre-roll ads...

  • Nah fam: South Africans aren’t too happy with the Samsung Galaxy S8’s price

    South Africans really don't like the price of the Samsung Galaxy S8. The Korean company's latest phone was outed today, sporting an infinity screen, an iris scanner and a new personal assistant dubbed Bixby. But it seems that the price got the most attention. Priced at R15 499 for the standard S8, and R17 499 for the Samsung Galaxy S8+, they are by no means cheap devices. And Twitter was all too ready to point that out. Our sister site Gearburn, while live-tweeting the event, saw a slew of retweets and mentions from users commenting on this particular tweet. Pricing info: R15499 for...

  • #UncleKathy: South Africa pays tribute to struggle giant Ahmed Kathrada

    Ahmed Kathrada, known as one of Nelson Mandela's closest allies and a defiant anti-apartheid activist, has died aged 87. The news broke on Twitter in the early hours of Tuesday morning, when the Kathrada Foundation tweeted that its namesake "has passed on". Ahmed #Kathrada has passed on. Details to follow. — Kathrada Foundation (@KathradaFound) March 28, 2017 Kathrada, or Uncle Kathy as many referred to him, was born in the North West town of Schweizer-Reneke in 1929. He was imprisoned with Nelson Mandela at Pollsmoor and Robben Island after the Rivonia Trial. He was released in 1990, and served in the Mandela administration. A...

  • When you date a girl from Instagram: an Imgur feel good story

    It's very rare in Donald Trump's day and age that you can flick on a social media network and see a genuinely comforting, heart-warming and encouraging story. But thankfully, this Imgur user provided us with just that this week. "So I met a girl on Instagram!" is the post in question, published to the image sharing site by user Habitualcritic. It has all the ingredients of a misleading and anger-inducing post, however, it's anything but. It's effectively a love story, told through the lens of the social network. "She was a 20 year old youth pastor and was really cute. I...

  • Xbox Ones and tiny tablets: this is South Africa’s ‘classroom of the future’

    When I was at school, the most advanced technology we had were space cases, chair bags and desks that didn't creak, but Microsoft and the Cape Town Science Centre's (CTSC) vision of education is quite different indeed. The Observatory-based institution today launched its classroom of the future exhibit to the public, backed by the Redmond tech giants, the likes of Intel, and a number of other technology partners. As one might expect, the exhibit doesn't include traditional text books or ink-based writing equipment, but rather things with screens, buttons and toggles. The exhibit, Microsoft explains, is a combination of what works...

  • FOODWeLove: the Woodstock deli mixing good food with social savvy

    As a willing slave to technology, I couldn't bear go without my smartphone for more than ten minutes. It's the de facto centre of my world, and a device that I'd probably be well lost without. But on the list of bare human necessities, I'd probably say that food comes a close second. When you combine these two things though -- that is, technology and things to cram down your throat -- some businesses begin to emerge. Now, that's not to say the little deli-cum-food delivery company FOODWeLove was unknown before, but if you've ever drove through Woodstock's main street, you...

  • Cape Town water crisis: the City’s current and future plans revealed

    City of Cape Town's water and energy efficiency strategist Sarah Rushmere today revealed just how stressed the greater Cape Town water supply system is. Speaking at a water-themed hackathon event at Woodstock's Rise Cape Town, Rushmere revealed that even with the City's current water restrictions, system maintenance and other measure in place, Cape Town still isn't saving enough. "People are using a third less water than they would a few summers ago. But it's not enough," she explained. The city, which is currently under the blanket of Level 3B water restrictions, has just 28% capacity remaining in its 15 dams at the...

  • TweetDeck might not be free for much longer

    Struggling to nail down a reliable revenue stream while controlling its often-irate user base, Twitter may soon charge you to use some elements of its currently-free service TweetDeck. Outed by The Verge, the social networking company is engaging with users through a survey to "assess the interest in a new, more enhanced version" of the web app. "We regularly conduct user research to gather feedback about people's Twitter experience and to better inform our product investment decisions, and we're exploring several ways to make Tweetdeck even more valuable for professionals," a company spokesperson told the site. This "advanced Tweetdeck experience", as Twitter...

  • Facebook’s new feature will turn it into a digital shopping mall

    In its never-ending quest to connect the world and make loads of cash doing it, Facebook has today announced a new shopping advertising format dubbed Collection that will helps brands showcase products on mobile. And yes, only mobile. "Mobile has reshaped how people discover, learn and ultimately buy from businesses," the company writes in an update. "People are also watching more videos on mobile, and shoppers want to see products as they exist in the real world—but they also expect fast-loading, seamless experiences when they discover and buy on mobile." The company's solution to this is to allow brands to tell their own...

  • Two-factor authentication is now live on Instagram

    Keeping pace with its contemporaries, Instagram now supports two-factor authentication. The system "adds an extra layer of security to your Instagram account by requiring a code every time you log in", announced company CEO Kevin Systrom in a blog post. "Tap the gear icon on your profile and choose Two-Factor Authentication to turn it on." This effectively means that those looking to infiltrate your account (and post pictures of dirty dishes, or unkempt gardens) can't simply use your password. Two-factor authentication, in essence, makes it damn difficult to crack users' accounts. The system has been adopted by a number of other services, including...

  • Mars Curiosity Rover is injured with no one around to fix it

    It's a sad lonely world for a space craft. You're sent deep into space beyond foreign worlds and forced to survive with little to no human assistance at all. For the Mars Curiosity Rover, it has lived on the Red Planet like this for nearly five years. And the little thing's still plodding along. But it's finally beginning to show its age. A routine check of the Rover's exterior performed earlier this month revealed that the left-middle wheel is taking quite a beating. Images were beamed back from the explorer this week, and tweeted via the Rover's personal Twitter account. These are...

  • Cape Town wants you to work from home (or take a bus) to reduce congestion

    The City of Cape Town would much prefer you working from home, or thinking twice about those nine-to-five slogs. This after the City revealed a work-in-progress strategy for reducing traffic congestion in Cape Town. According to an EWN report, the strategy will debut in front of council next week, and should include interesting proposals like a boost to public transport, parking perks that privilege irregular parking hours, and carpooling. More interestingly though, the City also wants employers to introduce flexible working hours, or a reduced work week. You can now smile a little wider. Perhaps working from home is the solution to...

  • Q&A: social media played an integral role during Madagascar’s Cyclone Enawo disaster

    Cyclone Enawo might be a distant memory for some, but for those in Madagascar, the strife has only just begun. It was the most violent storm to strike the island in over a decade and wreaked havoc across the nation, tracking along its spine. Madagascar was already suffering from severe drought, but the storm didn't exactly bring relief. The cyclone killed more than 50 people and forced more than 100 000 from their homes. The storm subsequently became a social media trend in the country and in Africa in the early weeks of March, with Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram the sources...

  • Uber’s selfie security system arrives in South Africa

    Transportation service Uber might've changed the way many travel about in South Africa, but it's also changing the way we use selfies. The company today announced a new security measure called Real-Time ID Check, which will require its drivers to occasionally send a selfie to Uber for verification purposes. The company then compares the picture sent to records of the driver, to allow said driver to operate the app. "This prevents fraud and protects drivers’ accounts from being compromised," the company writes on its official blog. "It also protects riders by building another layer of accountability into the app to ensure the...