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All posts by Adam Skikne

Adam Skikne currently works at studio4332 (www.studio4332.com) as a copywriter. Like most people in advertising, he is waiting for the inevitable death of traditional media so that clients can spend more money on cool digital things. He’s hopeful, yet skeptical, about social but is more excited about mobile. One day, he will have enough money for an Android phone as well as all the hidden data costs. Until then, he has a Blackberry and a very nice Android T-shirt. You can follow him on Twitter, but be warned: he’s not that exciting.
  • Health, connectivity and the rise of wearables in the Age of Context

    Age of Context is a new book by Robert Scoble and Shel Israel that is a must-read for anyone who is interested in the future of technology, social media, digital and business. The book details how companies are using the convergence of five key forces (mobile, social media, data, sensors and location) to create a new wave of smarter products and services. The book is fascinating and should get you excited about how technology is going to change our lives in the near future. Here are a few key trends that we can look forward to once we enter the...

  • What Glass means for Google

    Project Glass is a perfect example of what Google calls “moonshot thinking” – the type of thinking required to take on global-scale problems, define radical solutions to those problems, and succeed in solving those problems through the development of breakthrough technology. For Google, Glass is a device that could potentially change the way we search, the way we share and the way we interact with the world around us. Make no mistake, Project Glass is extremely ambitious which is part of the reason that it is so exciting. And if Glass succeeds, it could change the way the world sees...

  • A smart new world: the future we were promised is almost here

    At the end of 2012, Joshua Topolsky wrote an editorial for The Verge entitled “Reasons to be excited“. In the piece, Topolsky stated that while we’ve spent the past few years getting used to things like social networks, smartphones and tablets, 2013 will be the year where we will begin to understand the impact that these new technologies will have on our lives. Make no mistake. If you are in digital, it is definitely the time to be excited. We’ve all heard the proverbial promises of what will be possible “one day”. Well “one day” is almost here...

  • John McAfee: anti-virus pioneer, escaped murder suspect… master spy?

    Think you could do with an extra dose of crazy in your life? The latest John McAfee episode should do you just fine. Apparently the anti-virus pioneer turned murder suspect was actually a master spy the whole time. You might recall that back in November, McAfee went on the run after being declared a person of interest in the murder of his neighbour Gregory Faull on Ambergris Caye, an island off the coast of Belize. The American billionaire claimed that was he had been set up as a suspect by Belizian authorities and that if caught, he would be...

  • What Steve Jobs can teach us about hacking charisma

    Olivia Fox Cabane makes her living by teaching people the skills needed to be charismatic, influential and persuasive. During her career, she’s been invited to speak at Harvard, MIT, Google and the United Nations. And through her new book, The Charisma Myth: How Anyone Can Master the Art and Science of Personal Magnetism, Cabane wants to change the way you think about charisma. While most people think charisma is so something you’re either born with it or you’re not, Cabane believes that charisma is nothing more than a set of attitudes, skills and behaviours that can not only be practiced...

  • Jeff Jarvis’ ‘Public Parts': Understanding sharing in the digital age

    In his latest book, Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age Improves the Way We Work and Live, Jeff Jarvis traces the relationship between privacy and “publicness” and examines how it has been affected by a number of “new” technologies ranging from Gutenberg’s printing press and the Kodak camera to social networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Through the book, Jarvis argues that technology has always created fears about privacy throughout history. Today there are many advocates for privacy but there are few advocates for publicness. And whether you agree with him or not, it is refreshing to hear...

  • Why Amazon’s Android tablet could be amazing

    The majority of articles about Android all seem to start with the same statistic: About 1 in 2 of the world’s smartphones currently run Android. That’s impressive, especially since Android has only been around for 3 years. It seems that the world has gone gaga for Google’s little green robot, but while Android is clearly dominating global smartphone sales, the same thing cannot be said with regards to tablets. One of the main reasons for this is the iPad, a product manufactured by a company so obsessed with quality and so vertically integrated, that it’s able to outshine all of...

  • Hands on with Google+

    My experience with Google+ began last Thursday evening when I took to Facebook and Twitter and posted the following: Google+ looks pretty cool. Keen to give it a try… #hinthint #searchingforinvites #rememberyourgoodfriendadam I was pretty shocked to find that, within a few minutes, I had gotten a reply from somebody who knew somebody…and by the time I woke up on Friday morning, I had a Google+ invite waiting for me in my inbox. For those of you who don’t know, Google+ is Google’s latest attempt at cracking social — or rather, an attempt to get people to spend more time on Google...

  • A friendly warning — The other side of social marketing

    Naomi Klein’s NO LOGO chronicled a global backlash against a number of “super brands” that used advertising and branding in questionable ways to maximise their profits. The book helped produce a new class of conscientious consumers by highlighting some of the features of an overly branded and globalised world: No Space, No Choice and No Jobs. NO LOGO was the warning on the label of the bad mood rising against corporate brands that abused their role and influence in society. And while the world has changed since the book was first published, the reality that some brands choose to put...