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All posts by Graeme Lipschitz: Columnist

Graeme Lipschitz: Columnist
Graeme Lipschitz is the co-founder of digital innovation agency Wonderland Works where he heads up Social Media, Search and Product Development. He was previously the business development manager at Clicks2Customers.com and has worked for Google UK and South Africa as a lead account strategist, growing Adwords accounts in the Travel, Finance and Retail sectors.
  • 5 things corporates need to learn about Augmented Reality

    “Augmented Reality is one of the Top 10 strategic IT technologies of all time.” – Gartner Inc. The question I get asked the most, and I guess it’s a sign of the technology’s novelty, is: “So what exactly is augmented reality?” The next question usually has something to do with The Matrix, Minority Report or Inception. But it’s really quite simple: Augmented Reality is a piece of technology that links a real life trigger (which can be a printed picture, a photo, or anything that can be recognized by your device’s camera) to a digital asset: your company’s website, a...

  • Augmented Reality: a marketing primer

    “When you think of any aspect of life or work, augmented reality is completely going to change how we do it.” – Ori Inbar Augmented Reality (AR) is a technology platform wherein real life objects or “triggers” are scanned by a digital device in order to return information, a website or other digital media. The technology can also superimpose a computer-generated image on a user's view of the real world, thus providing a composite view. The technology is hardly new, although you might not have heard about it yet because technologists, marketers and CTOs are still trying to figure out use...

  • 5 ways to get ‘tech-dumb’ CMOs to sign onto your digital marketing solution

    It’s easy enough selling ice to eskimoes; they actually know the benefits of ice and see it everday, but try selling a technology solution to a person who has never heard of it and the task becomes herculean. Digital era requirements stipulate that the CMO should be well versed in technology and its advantages, but more often than not in South Africa, it’s going to be the first time this person has heard of Google Adwords, Augmented Reality, and Integrated Marketing. So how do you get them up to speed on all the latest developments so that when you...

  • Android, Nest and Now: why Google gets that less is more

    I've got an admission to make: I am an IFTTT addict. In fact, the people who know me best would say that I got IFTTT to type out this article, but that's not possible -- yet. "If This Then That" is an incredible service that ushers 2013's buzzword "the Internet of Things" into your life in splendid fashion: from automatically emailing you when your favourite surf spot is cooking to flashing your lights at home when you get a Facebook message, IFTTT can do it all. The Internet of Things is the next great technological battleground that companies like IFTTT,...

  • Ad exchanges and ad networks work best together: here’s why

    Web publishers have myriad ways of profiting from users coming to their sites. Display, or banner, advertising has been around since particular web pages became popular and needed to monetise. How these things work Advertisers needed to buy inventory but internet audiences are increasingly fragmented according to their demographics and interests -- so ad networks aggregated inventory across many sites in order to provide the size of audience that traditional avenues like television had previously offered. Inventory would be sold on a cost-per-thousand impressions (views) or, as it termed, CPM basis. For a more technical explanation of how ad networks work,...

  • #iam4rhinos: behind the conservation campaign that dominated Twitter

    #Iam4rhinos has taken Twitter by storm over the past week with celebrities and normal Twitter users getting it to trend globally at #1. While the intention of the campaign has been noble, critics have stated that this is just slacktivism and that the campaign will have no real world effect. Graeme Lipschitz sat down with Tara Turkington, CEO of Flow Communications (the company that ran the #iam4rhinos campaign on behalf of and in partnership with WWF South Africa) for her views. Memeburn: Without going into detail, what is your commercial arrangement with WWF South Africa? Tara Turkington: WWF South Africa paid...

  • Pay per gaze — has Google gone one step too far?

    Google is well known for being innovative in the online advertising space. Its flagship advertising program, Adwords, has grossed over $50bn since its inception and has created jobs worldwide, not only for Google itself but for online agencies which adopted it for their clients. Yet whilst it’s done a great job of showing the right ads to the right users at the right time, it’s also made some fairly creepy moves lately, one of which is undoubtedly getting a patent granted for “pay per gaze”: a piece of technology (apparently used via Google Glass) which tracks how users react to...

  • Hang W/ the world: we chat to the man behind the next big thing in social video

    In case you've been living under a rock for the past six months: social video is the new black. Arguably, Vine set the standard in June 2012 with its short six second video service. It was enough to grab the attention of Twitter, which acquired the startup in October of the same year. Shortly after it debuted as a free iOS app, it became the number one most downloaded free app in the store and the most used video application in the market. In June, Facebook's newly acquired Instagram played "catch-up" by launching its own 15 second video service. What set...

  • Will it be third time lucky for Google TV with Chromecast?

    Google’s recent Chromecast announcement sent flutters across the net as it drew the battle line with rivals like Apple and Netflix. Although Chromecast is compatible with iOS and also broadcasts Netflix, it promotes Google’s own services like Google Music, Movies and TV too. Recent headlines indicated that Netflix and YouTube account for half of America’s internet traffic in the first half of 2013; with the former accounting for 32.3% according to Sandvine. That’s a lot of time that people aren’t searching on Google, and the less people search on Google, the less clicks happen on Google’s core revenue product:...

  • The end of Moore’s law: Q&A with POET technologies’ Peter Copetti

    In the third and final installment on the Moore’s Law series, Graeme Lipschitz sits down with POET technologies executive, Peter Copetti, to discuss their technology and what they’re doing to counteract the end game of Moore’s Law. Memeburn: What is POET Technologies and what do you do? Peter Copetti: POET Technologies (formerly OPEL Technologies) provides a patented process and methodology for the design and manufacturing of next generation integrated circuits, which will power the next wave of chipset innovation. The POET platform is a flexible one that utilizes gallium and arsenide instead of traditional silicon which allows for a quantum step...

  • The end of Moore’s Law: where to next?

    In the second article of the series, Memeburn columnist Graeme Lipschitz discusses how technologists are innovating to take computer processing and storage forward. So we've run out of surface area and going all multi-core has only helped so much. What now? One way to go is up. Skyscraper chips Think of it this way: when humans had taken up too much of the "ground floor" they started making skyscrapers. A similar effect is envisioned for chips and storage - going "3D" - so to speak. The only problem at the moment is that these new chips can only be written on once - making...

  • The end of Moore’s Law: a brief history

    In this first of a series of articles, Graeme Lipschitz discusses what Moore’s law is, some theory and history behind it, and why it is coming to an end. In the second article of this series, he will discuss how technologists are innovating to take computer processing and storage forward. You’ve heard of Moore’s and Kryder’s Laws respectively, right? The ones where semiconductor chip performance doubles (Moore) every 24 months or so and storage space doubles (on the same area) while the cost of it halves every 14 months (Kryder). The improvement in chip speed, storage space and even pixel size...

  • Why Facebook ‘likes’ won’t be a ‘vital’ part of free speech any time soon

    Facebook recently argued in court that the “Like” feature is an integral part of free speech. A lawyer for the company argued that “Likes” are “vital” to the 500m people who use Facebook every day and that they should be protected by the US Constitution. “Any suggestion that such communication has less than full constitutional protection would result in chilling the very valued means for communication the Internet has made possible,” Aaron Panner, Facebook Inc. (FB)’s lawyer said. The court ruling states that “likes” do not amount to a “substantive statement” where “substantive” can mean “real” or “independent in existence...

  • Blink and you’re dead: behind Google’s decision to fork WebKit

    In what is widely seen as a political move against Apple, Google has forked WebKit into “Blink” which it describes as “an inclusive open source community” and ”a new rendering engine based on WebKit” that is going to “naturally evolve in different directions.” The biggest change users can expect to see is in all Chrome-based applications in the near future. According to Google VP of Engineering Linus Upson its engineers were feeling constrained by WebKit’s technical complexity and wanted to use something simpler. The appropriately named “Blink”, therefore, should bring a lot more speed and simplicity to rendering on...

  • 5 things startups can learn from surfers

    Surfing isn't exactly the sport one would associate with startups, but there's a lot to be learned from hanging ten that applies to the world of online business: Know the conditions Ideal surfing conditions are a cumulation of swell, tides and wind. Ideally, offshore conditions hold up he wave, giving the surfer more surface area on which to surf. Similarly, startups should have an idea of what their market's conditions are -- for example: knowing that iOS users monetise better than Android users means that iOS development takes precedence if you want to monetise early. Read more on Ventureburn. var vglnk={key:"cc324b6567a9637aa0ff15bc9564b2a5"};!function(e,a){var...