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All posts tagged "journalism"

  • What The Guardian’s next editor might think about technology, and what that would mean for journalism

    It was the first major news organisation to introduce live blogging, and the first to open commenting across its site. With 120-million unique visitors this January, theguardian.com has become one the world's most popular and important news websites. Yet after two decades of spearheading its online growth, The Guardian's editor announced his departure last year. This past week, four internal candidates presented their arguments for why they should be the next editor-in-chief. Each statement offered an intimate view into how these candidates view themselves, what they think the role of an editor should be and the emphasis they place on the British newspaper's online expansion. By...

  • How to make your journalistic Twitter network rock: A case study

    Twitter is as essential a tool for journalism these days as a pen and notepad once were. One tweet can be can be as valuable as afternoon spent buying drinks for a source. It's also a great way of spreading your own content and building your name as a journalist. The same rules that apply to big brands when it comes to Twitter, apply to you as a journalist. It's not just about using Twitter, it's about how you use it and how you measure up to your competitors. There are a number of tools that let you do...

  • 6 breakthrough startups set to disrupt the news industry

    In April this year, Memeburn picked ten innovative Knight News Challenge entries that had the potential to propel the news industry forward. The “Networks" leg of the competition required entrants to innovate on top of existing social media and other services to create new ways for informing and engaging communities. The Knight Foundation recently announced the winners of the first round at the MIT-Knight Civic Media Conference. The winning ventures will receive US$1.37-million in funding as well as support from the Knight Foundation’s network of peers and advisers. The second round of the competition aims to spur innovation in its “Data"...

  • Are memes the future of news?

    Comic-meme creation and consumption has taken internet culture by storm and seems to be only increasing in frequency and engagement. Memes come in all types but in this case ‘LOL cats’ and ‘Rage comics’ are being produced at a rate never seen before. Ben Huh wants to turn this mechanic into news delivery. In a recent interview the man behind I can haz cheezburger spoke of how he sees ‘meme-mechanics’ as the future of news content distribution. His argument centers on how subjectivity is king when it comes to content on the internet and a cultural shift is taking place,...

  • Why the new iPad might not be the tablet that saves journalism

    “Sorry, it is not available,” the shop assistant told me. Ordering online wasn't a possibility either; the ASUS Transformer was nowhere to be found. My rooted, white Pandigital tablet was too clumsy and slow for the job of mobile reporting and reading. I needed a real, powerful tablet. After quite some time, I decided to change my church -- if there was no open source Android tablet, then I would take the new iPad. I had almost bought one, when a shop assistant mentioned he had two of the ASUS Transformers in stock. Here's why I went for the latter....

  • When did tech journalism become about scooping product specs?

    Why has tech reporting become such tedious product journalism? Why are reporters trying to scoop each other on news that is essentially a spec sheet about a mass-produced product? Why are we reading about products as a news story and not in an ad? When I look at the tech press it is heavily focused on product reporting; about gadgets, features in apps or online services, and details about underlying technologies in software, hardware, and the internet. Product launches, especially by industry heavyweights such as Apple, are examined in great detail before the launch, in live reports from the launch, and for...

  • Media corrections and our social reputations

    The modern news cycle has been diminished to a matter of minutes -- even less on services like Twitter. And it seems to just keep speeding up. As newsrooms become increasingly hard pressed to produce news content quickly -- very quickly -- they find themselves facing an audience that demands near immediate reporting on events and expects that reporting to be factually correct. But journalists make mistakes too and maybe as a profession it has sold itself into the 'we are relevant because we only publish the facts' corner too effectively. 'You can trust that we will be transparent in how...

  • The continuing rise of activist media and the demise of the Fourth Estate

    In a recent article, I pointed out that activist media, such as the posts, tweets, photos, and videos produced by the Occupy Wall Street activists, will become increasingly influential, while the establishment media, such as CNN or New York Times, will decline in influence. The reason is that the business model for establishment media is under siege and that means cutbacks in resources. There are simply fewer journalists, editors, photographers, camera operators, and there will be even fewer in the future as cutbacks continue to decimate the ranks of media professionals. But activist media needs no business model, it is staffed...

  • ‘The blog is dead, long live the blog’ — Chris Anderson on the future of media

    We may need new words for journalists, editors and the "news", because their definitions are constraining and changing. Maybe the editors of the future will be known as "community managers"? Everyone's publishing, everyone's writing these days -- and perhaps these community managers will be the new curators? In this interview, Wired editor and international technology commentator Chris Anderson (Read Part 1: "The Closing Web" here) suspects that "the ranks of people creating news is going to grow hugely, including many people who are doing it for non-commercial reasons". Non-journalists are broadcasting relevant news on the web like never before via...

  • The Sunday Times and the racist photo Facebook blunder

    Fresh questions have arisen over the regulation and reliability of content on social networks after one of South Africa’s leading newspapers faced embarrassment as it emerged that its dramatic weekend lead story, based on a graphically-racist Facebook profile photo, was in fact a three-year old story -- and had been extensively covered. The abhorrent picture depicts a white male kneeling over the body of an apparently lifeless black child in the manner of a hunting photo. There were also questions over the veracity of the picture itself. The story received world-wide attention after being picked up by major news services such...

  • Survey: Journalists criticise blogs and social media

    A survey of nearly 500 journalists across 15 countries has found that some journalists use social media and blogs to source and verify stories. But the majority don't. Nearly half of respondents (47 percent) said they used Twitter to source new story angles. Over a third said they used Facebook (35 percent). Blogs were also highlighted as a key element of this process with 30 percent saying they used blogs they were familiar with, while 42 percent also drew from blogs they had not visited before. However, the study also validated the continued importance of the PR representative with nearly...

  • Facebook — Making journalism more social

    Journalists everywhere are beginning to understand not only the reach of social media but also its potential as a newsroom. The rise of social media has allowed journalists to begin sourcing for news and discussing a different way of using alternate tools. News-gathering and news consumption have become more social… and so has the medium. Social media journalism, or journalism through social media, is no longer a new concept; it is simply journalism in 140 characters. Understanding the role social media plays in journalism today, Facebook unveiled a new Facebook Page and ‘Meetup program’ for journalists. The Page, Journalists...

  • ‘Support good journalism — Pay the wall’

    I don't understand the current debate over the New York Times paywall. Yes, it has holes in it and yes it is a bit lame but the question it asks is: will you support quality journalism? That's an important question. But it seems that the Geekorati believe that once something is free then it should be free forever, and that if you can get past the New York Times paywall, then you are smart. I disagree and here's why: I remember when the Internet first started, when domain names were free. When the first advertising that appeared on the internet it was greeted...

  • Curation: A proxy for ‘social media’?

    Curation is a hot topic and it's a topic that is being enthusiastically adopted by many in social media -- so much so that curation and social media seem to be beginning to be used interchangeably. Take a look at this post on the BBC College of Journalism blog -- Social media: what's the difference between curation and journalism? The post takes a look at a discussion between journalists on the topic of using video from Libya: "On Friday, 'mainstream' media made a bad mistake when it ran images of fighting in the Libyan town of Zawiyah - Reuters picked up...

  • Churnalism: Journalism from press releases

    Journalists love to write original stories but there is also a lot of re-write work that has to be done: quick shorts, events, announcements, etc, stuff that doesn't usually need a phone call or too much fact-checking. In today's media world, the temptation to churn out stories based on just a press release is very high because content demands are high. And this is where Churnalism.com, a new site based in the UK, tries to help. It will identify stories based on a press release and analyse how much of the published story was copied and pasted -- or rewritten...