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All posts by Tony Seifart

Tony Seifart
With a Degree in Heavy Current Electrical Engineering from UCT Tony Seifart quit his first job after six months when he realised his boss was the one making all the money. Since 2002 he’s been working as an internet marketer, using the internet to build an online income and intermittently running workshops and courses teaching others to do the same. Tony now runs a small digital agency, Incredibility, which focuses on GoogleAds, Facebook Marketing and Lead Generation for small and medium sized businesses. When he’s not in the office he’s drinking coffee with friends, reading a book or taking over the world.
  • Could remnant ad sales kill online publishers?

    Every week I’ll get an email from a random agency telling me they absolutely love my site and they’d like to advertise on it. This gets me really excited, because I work incredibly hard on it. It has fairly decent traffic too, about 5 000 unique visitors a day, so to monetise the site would be a dream-come-true. Said random agency will ask me for all sorts of stats about my site. I’ll email them everything including my now-deceased grandfather’s birth certificate from Prussia, because they need to be absolutely sure that I am a “genuine” publisher. They’ll want site...

  • BlackBerry blunders to magnificent Marissa: 2013’s biggest winners and losers in tech

    The year 2013 has been a big year of highs and lows for the tech industry. We’ve seen some great start-ups hit the big league this year. At the same time we’ve seen the fall and demise of a few giants in the industry. Looking back through the year, here’s a few winners and losers that we thought stood out: Losers of 2013 1. BlackBerry After years of development and promise, Blackberry finally launched its OS10 edition along with two great phones: the Q10 and the Z10. The only problem is their phones were five years late. If these phones were...

  • 5 signs you might be getting too old for the internet

    I’m starting to think I may be getting too old for the internet. I got my first computer in 1991. It was a 286 running DOS 3.1 and had a 20MB Hard Disk and an amber monitor. Playing on it made me feel like I was running the NASA space station. It felt awesome. A lot has changed since then. Not only are computers interconnected but so are we. With a smartphone in our pockets we have access to the total knowledge of the human race, at the tip of our fingers. Just pause and think about that for a minute....

  • Screw the startups, Africa needs more ‘netrepreneurs’

    It’s the dream of any tech-person: come up with an idea or concept that you can build up and sell off for millions. Consider something as banal as Draw Something which only a few weeks after its release was sold to Zynga for US$180-million. Everyone wants the “Big Score”. Technology and App Development in South Africa, Nigeria and Kenya have pushed hard towards finding thing that will make venture capitalists and sponsors sit up and notice. Startups seem to be all about the quick get-in and get-out; lacking very little substance. Read more on Ventureburn.

  • 5 simple things you can do on LinkedIn to boost your career

    If social networks were people then LinkedIn would be the grey-suited accountant sitting at the corner of a party too shy to talk to people. Twitter, of course would be the hipster chick and Facebook would be the jock in the cloakroom talking about his recent conquests. I recently saw a message posted on Facebook that read “Daughter, if you want to be successful in life, ignore the jock and spend time with the nerds in the class”; and it got me thinking: how often are we ignoring LinkedIn as a powerful tool to further our careers. LinkedIn isn’t pretty to...

  • 5 ways the internet has ruined Christmas

    We’re only mere days away from Christmas and my house isn’t feeling very Christmassy. And it seems I’m not the only one. There have been quite a few remarks between my friends that Christmas isn’t exactly what it used to be like. It’s not the rampant commercialism of the holiday that has us vexed, but rather the lack of that special Christmassy spirit that we’re used to. Nary a shop assistant will wear a Christmas hat these days. Shops are full of jostling masses of people looking for the ultimate Christmas gifts. So whose fault is it? I have decided to blame...

  • 10 South Africans worth following on Twitter

    So you may have just joined this thing called Twitter, or you’ve become completely bored with your friends talking about their pets and kids. Looking for some interesting people to talk to on Twitter? We’ve compiled a list of 10 top South African personalities you should be following on Twitter, and why we think they’re worth it: Helen Zille: @helenzille “Aunty Helen” is the Premier of the Western Cape and the leader of the Democratic Alliance, South Africa’s official opposition party. One of the country’s top prolific tweeters, she often interacts with her followers, helps people resolve issues in their community or...

  • Has Apple outsmarted Google?

    Once allies, now clearly foes, Apple and Google have been in an intense battle to win the hearts and minds of people across the planet. And while Apple has lost its dominance and market-share to Google’s Android, you could argue that the Cupertino-based giant has outsmarted its Mountain View rival. If we look purely at the numbers then we all know that Google is the clear leader. Relying on various brands, like Samsung and HTC, Android has swamped our markets with phones ranging from the low-cost Galaxy Pocket to the more sophisticated Samsung S3. Samsung has a clear edge on...

  • Online community rallies to free Ethiopian blogger

    In July 2012 an Ethiopian journalist and blogger was sentenced for 18 years after writing a blog post critical of the government’s anti-terrorist laws. Eskinder Nega, along with 23 other journalists, had expressed outrage at the laws, which allowed the government sweeping powers to silence opposition and dissent. Shortly before to his arrest, Nega had criticised the government’s harsh laws and called for it to respect freedom of speech. He was sentenced to...

  • Whip out your credit card! How online made Black Friday a global phenomenon

    Today is Black Friday and you know what that means — you’ll be hunting shops galore for amazing specials with discounts of up to 60% off selected goodies. Black Friday is the day after Thanksgiving in the United States. It’s the official start to the holiday season and retail outlets across the US will shell out huge discounts to attract as many Christmas Dollars as they can. It’s referred to “Black Friday” because it’s traditionally the first opportunity companies have to put their balance sheets “back in the black”. Last year shoppers in the US spent a staggering US$52-billion on Black...

  • Steve Hofmeyr’s Wikipedia page hacked

    Controversial South African Afrikaans singer Steve Hofmeyr had his personal Wikipedia page hacked on Monday. The page now describes him as a prominent member of a Mormon split, called The Morons and an honourary chairman of ‘Avrikaanirs met Leer Probleeme’ (Afrikaners with Learning Disabilities). The majority of the changed content was in the opening paragraph, which read: He is a prominent member of the Mormon Church split group, known as The Morons, who believe members should conceive as many children with as many women as possible. In addition, Hofmeyr is the honorary chairman of Avrikaanirs met Leer Probleeme (Afrikaners with...

  • US pirates face potential lifetime internet ban

    US-based ISP MediaCom has announced a three-strike rule for Digital Pirates which will result in a lifetime ban from its network. Online Piracy makes up a significant portion of internet traffic with some research pointing to more than 22% of bandwidth used online for the transmission of copyrighted material. From music, TV-series, Movies and software, online piracy is rough. Organisations like MegaUpload and PirateBay have made it their business to help facilitate the searching and finding of copyrighted material as regular search engines, like Google, are put under increasing pressure to censure words like “torrent” and “megaupload”. A joint initiative by interested...

  • Google Docs to ditch Office 1997-2007 format (.doc, .xls, .ppt) on 1 October

    Google made announcements to upcoming changes to its popular Google Docs system this week which will affect its ability to export documents to older versions of Microsoft Office. While Google has been known in the past to kill unpopular products, (Google Wave and Google Buzz in 2010/2011 were its most spectacular failures) this year has been more about solidifying its product line. In an announcement yesterday Google said its system would no longer support older 1997-2007 Office Suite formats, which include .doc, .xls and .ppt. This could mean some troubles for companies which rely on the older software suits and Google...

  • Newsweek’s #muslimrage: giant mistake or publicity genius?

    Popular US news magazine Newsweek received an online lambasting on Monday when tweeters took to the social network to poke fun at its hashtag #muslimrage. Newsweek featured a front cover photograph of the recent Middle Eastern unrest regarding an online video casting Islam in a negative light. The accompanying article was written by Ayaan Hirsi Ali who herself was involved with previous anti-American and pro-Islamic marches but who seems to have had a change of heart after the terrorist attacks in 2001. Newsweek encouraged its followers and readers to discuss the article with the accompanying hashtag #muslimrage, which is when the...

  • Mind your language and stop worrying about crowdsourced dictionaries

    Words like ‘amazeballs’, ‘Facebook’, ‘totes’ and ‘frenemy’ are officially part of the English language. In July 2012 the Collins English Dictionary decided to “crowdsource” new words to the English Language by allowing the public to submit words (and definitions) they thought had become part of our everyday lexicon. Late yesterday, it released a list of approximately 80 words that would be added to its online dictionary. What constitutes an English word or not has more been in the realm of scholars and professors (most notably from Oxford), but the move from Collins certainly shows how much the world has changed. For...