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All posts by Julia Breakey

  • Last week in trailers: John Boyega, Nicolas Cage, and Andre the Giant walk into a bar

    Every year, advertisers spend millions of dollars to premiere their content during the US's ultra-popular Super Bowl. The massive event, scheduled for 4 February, has a sad effect on the week preceding, with studios holding back their major trailers -- either storing them for the Super Bowl itself or holding them back to avoid being overshadowed. Needless to say, last week's trailers were nothing to write home about. But if you still need that fix, here they are. Pacific Rim Uprising The only major release last week was for the sequel Pacific Rim Uprising. The trailer promises action from Star Wars' John Boyega as he joins...

  • This is what happens when you call the Gwara Gwara the stanky leg

    Rihanna lit up the Grammy stage last night with her performance of "Wild Thoughts" with DJ Khaled, but it was her final dance move, the local Gwara Gwara, that really tickled South African senses. So when US-based publication Vulture.com called the move the stanky leg, it was met with an appropriate level of ire. Do the stanky leg. pic.twitter.com/nDPJFmY1zb — Vulture (@vulture) January 29, 2018 While the stanky leg adopts a similar stance, it is not the Gwara Gwara. The former sees the dancer move their leg in a circular motion and then alternate to the opposite leg. The local Gwara Gwara is a more...

  • Zille responds to DA criticism, states colonialism isn’t all bad

    I regret to inform you that Helen Zille is back on her bullshit. Last year, the Western Cape Premier ignited outrage when she defended colonialism on Twitter. And now, a year and one empty apology later, she's rehashed the argument in defense against DA criticism. Does Helen Zille care more about defending herself than her frustrated constituents? In March 2017, after attending an event in Singapore, Zille commented on what she believed were positive effects of colonialism. "For those claiming legacy of colonialism was ONLY negative, think of our independent judiciary, transport infrastructure, piped water etc. (sic)," she wrote on Twitter. For those claiming...

  • South Africans binged Netflix’s weirdest shows in 2017

    A lot of people like to make kooky jokes about how their country is "weird", and that "only people here like to do this slightly strange thing that isn't actually abnormal". But last year, South Africans on Netflix really tried their best. Of the shows released in 2017, the nation's viewers picked out the oddest collection of series to binge, from religious dramas to teen mockumentaries to mysterious sci-fis. Top of the list of shows South Africans binged last year was the Mexican political thriller Ingobernable. Behind it was Oprah's Greenleaf, a show about the family who own a Memphis megachurch, and in third was dick-obsessed mockumentary American Vandal. Here's...

  • TWR Podcast: Apps to #DefeatDayZero, #MarkFishChallenge, Qualcomm fine, and more

    Welcome to The Weekly Roundup podcast, where we talk the latest in tech and startup news! This week, Hadlee Simons hosts Andy Walker and Stephen Timm. First on the agenda is the conversation on every Capetonian's lips: the water crisis. As the city moves closer to Day Zero, Andy talks some nifty apps that can help residents save water, as well as stay in the know about dam developments. On the podcast this week: water crisis apps, Mark Fish, Gauteng startups, and that Qualcomm fine The team then moves on to the local Twitter meme of the week, soccer legend Mark Fish. After...

  • #MarkFishChallenge: South African Twitter’s latest meme

    Former South African soccer player Mark Fish became the laughing stock of the web this week when he tweeted about jazz legend Hugh Masekela's passing on Tuesday. "We love you forever," Fish wrote. "Thank you!" The issue? The attached image was one of Fish with Sipho "Hotstix" Mabuse, who is still "very much alive". #MarkFish I am very much alive - oops ask my family or manager @MartinMyers or @BillyMonama - I am alive and well pic.twitter.com/5MWU2Hyhup — Hotstix (@siphohotstix) January 23, 2018 Fish deleted the tweet, apologised, and posted a picture of the real Masekela, but not before Twitter latched on with the #MarkFishChallenge. #MarkFishChallenge Black Coffee pic.twitter.com/PbcOLo33oE —...

  • Maze Runner: The Death Cure takes you on a zombified tour of Cape Town

    There are a lot of reasons to be excited for Maze Runner: The Death Cure: it closes out the Maze Runner trilogy, it features plenty pretty people, and its opening marks the end of the teen dystopia phase kickstarted by The Hunger Games in 2012. But if you're a friend of Cape Town, there's an extra reason to spend 2h23m watching a group of teens get miraculously rescued time and again. The film, set in what can be assumed is futuristic America, was shot almost entirely in the Mother City, and the filmmakers do not shy away from embracing local...

  • Fake news catches Helen Zille, Cyril Ramaphosa off guard

    During the 2016 US presidential election, "fake news" was a hot topic. Articles about Hillary Clinton declaring Sharia law permeated the web, as did the likes of one that claimed Donald Trump had called Republicans the "dumbest group of voters". These stories were largely coming from places like Macedonia -- where companies (known as "troll factories") were earning massive ad revenue -- and Russia, where it's alleged the Kremlin had a part to play in the election's outcome. But just because these motives were rooted in the US, as well as its potential for clicks, doesn't mean other countries aren't susceptible...

  • SA’s box office: it’s still a jungle out there

    It's the third week of 2018, and South Africa is still enamoured by Dwayne Johnson, Kevin Hart, Jack Black, and Karen Gillan's stint as modern teenagers trapped inside a video game. And why not? Critics have said Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle is charming, nostalgic, and -- according to Vulture -- "you could do far worse". If the audience could do worse, Jumanji would struggle to do better. With just four weeks on the chart, the film has pulled in R48.6-million. That's more than Despicable Me 3 made in its entire run -- and it was the second highest-grossing film in Southern Africa last year. But are the weak...

  • Last week in trailers: The Handmaid’s Tale, Tomb Raider, Queer Eye, and more

    If the real world is getting you down -- and that 50l water limit in Cape Town even more so -- then here's a list of fictional people doing fictional things designed to keep you entertained. And also some real-world horrors because life is cruel and I'm helping you practice vigilance. Tomb Raider Alicia Vikander's Lara Croft is back, and she's not upsetting as many YouTube commenters the second time around. This Tomb Raider trailer features the same scenes from the first re-edited, and an eerie Destiny's Child cover. Apparently that's all you need to win viewers' hearts. Tomb Raider opens in South Africa on 16 March. The Handmaid's Tale The first...

  • These were the biggest movies in Southern Africa in 2017

    Hollywood did not have a great 2017. During the US summer blockbuster season, South Africa took a 17% drop in revenue from 2016. The US didn't fare that much better, and pundits began worrying the year would be disastrous for Hollywood. So how did we come out in the end? And which films won over locals' hearts? Grab some popcorn, because this is how South Africans (and Zimbabweans) were spending their money at the cinemas last year. Fast and Furious 8 was the highest-grossing film in South Africa last year The most prolific film of the year was Fast and Furious 8, which...

  • Last week in trailers: Red Sparrow, Black Panther, Teen Titans Go! and more

    Last week felted like it lasted eons. The logical reason is that the first week back at work always feels like that -- but I'm going to blame it on movie studios and their not-so-exciting trailer lineup. That makes way more sense. Red Sparrow Jennifer Lawrence sports a terrible wig and a Russian accent in this first full trailer for Red Sparrow. Directed by Francis Lawrence (who also worked with the actress in the Hunger Games franchise), the film tells of a "master of seductive and manipulative combat" who has too much of a soul to truly become the best. Catch Red Sparrow in SA cinemas 2 March. Black Panther Black...

  • Facebook redirects focus to social interaction, leaving businesses in the dust

    In a post to Facebook Thursday, CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced that the company was changing its focus from providing users with "relevant" content to that which drives social interaction. The announcement is consistent with tests to the News Feed that Facebook ran last year, which moved all Page content (from the likes of businesses, brands, and media) from the News Feed to the Explore tab. But these tests were met with criticism. Take, for instance, the Serbian editor of a non-profit investigative journalism organisation who wrote an op-ed in the New York Times decrying the change as detrimental to Serbia's already shaky democracy. CEO Mark Zuckerberg...

  • TWR Podcast: 2018 tech, crypto prospects and 2017 porn stats

    Welcome back to The Weekly Roundup, where the Burn Media staff talk the latest in tech and startup news! This week, Hadlee Simons hosts Andy Walker and Stephen Timm. We kick off with Ventureburn, and the gang talks South Africans in the tech startup ecosystem you should follow in 2018. And if you think you can avoid cryptocurrency this year, think again; Stephen tells us what to expect from the ongoing boom. Second on the agenda is the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES), showcasing some of what 2018 is bringing in the world of tech. From loads of new laptops to US$30 000...

  • Google Doodle honours anti-apartheid activist Alan Paton

    Anti-apartheid activist and author Alan Paton, who wrote the novel Cry, the Beloved Country in 1948, is the subject of Thursday's Google Doodle as the platform celebrates what would have been his 115th birthday. The static Doodle features a painted Paton enjoying the train ride said to have inspired the now-classic novel that helped incite local and global anger at the apartheid regime. "I hoped to influence my fellow whites," Paton said of the novel before passing away in 1988 at the age of 85. "I still believe there is hope." Alan Paton wrote Cry, the Beloved Country to spur his "fellow whites" into action Cry, the...