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All posts tagged "iran"

  • It’s a blue world: Facebook’s empire grows in latest map of social networks

    Facebook may or may not be dead to teenagers. If it is, it could certainly be an issue in the future but right now, the world's largest social network is on top in all but a few countries. The latest world map of social networks from Vinco shows that Facebook is dominant in 127 of the 137 countries analysed. That's as many as it laid claim to when the last map was released in June 2013, but there has been a bit of shuffling. According to the blog's creator Vincenzo Consenza, Facebook lost Kyrgyzstan, but managed to take...

  • Iran to give all citizens state-controlled email addresses

    Iran has taken another step in its bid for complete control over its citizens' online activities. Following plans for an "Iran-ternet", selective filtering of social media sites and blocking of international email providers, the state will apparently begin assigning email addresses to each citizen. According to Reuters, communications minister Mohammad Hassan Nami said that the email addresses would aid communication between the Iranian state and its people. "For mutual interaction and communication between the government and the people, from now on every Iranian will receive a special email address," the semi-official Mehr news agency quoted Nami as saying. "With...

  • Meeker files: emerging markets own web growth, mobile on top

    People around the globe are still coming online on the for the first time in their millions. That much of that growth comes from emerging markets is to be expected. More surprising is that some of the highest rates of internet adoption come from authoritarian states. Most famously, China has the world's largest online population despite its citizens' internet access being severely curtailed by a series of controls known colloquially as the Great Firewall of China. Iran meanwhile has threatened to cut off access to external sites, yet its online population has grown by 205% in the past year....

  • Iran’s government starts censoring Google search and Gmail

    In the wake of the anti-Islam YouTube video that has led to widespread protests in the Muslim world, Iran has announced that it intends to restrict access to Google products like search and Gmail indefinitely. Iranian citizens were informed of the government's decision via a message on state television and SMS over the weekend. According to the BBC, Abdul Samad Khoramabadi, an adviser to Iran's public prosecutor's office, said that "Google and Gmail will be filtered nationwide, and will remain filtered until further notice." Google-owned YouTube has been blocked in the country for some time. The country's Mehr news agency...

  • Iran bans international email providers like Gmail and Yahoo! Mail

    In another example of the censorship that lead to the country being declared the biggest enemy of internet freedom, the Iranian government is reportedly banning access to international email providers like Gmail, Yahoo Mail and Hotmail. According to AFP, the Iranian telecommunications agency has ordered that banks, insurance firms and telephone operators in the country switch over to email providers with .ir domains, and cease contacting clients who are using international email providers. If people want to communicate with these businesses, they have to use an email address ending in iran.ir, post.ir or chmail.ir. Universities must use email addresses...

  • ‘Iran-ternet’ reportedly set to roll out fully by August

    Iran plans to completely block its citizens from accessing the web by August. By then it hopes to restrict access to its own sanitised, internal Intranet. According to the International Business Times, the first phase of the project will be rolled out in May, during which services from the likes of Yahoo!, Google, and Hotmail will be replaced by Iran Search and Iran email. According to Reza Taghipour, the Iranian minister for...

  • Jeff Jarvis’ ‘Public Parts': Understanding sharing in the digital age

    In his latest book, Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age Improves the Way We Work and Live, Jeff Jarvis traces the relationship between privacy and "publicness" and examines how it has been affected by a number of "new" technologies ranging from Gutenberg’s printing press and the Kodak camera to social networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Through the book, Jarvis argues that technology has always created fears about privacy throughout history. Today there are many advocates for privacy but there are few advocates for publicness. And whether you agree with him or not, it is refreshing to hear...

  • 300 000 Iranian IP addresses stolen

    Almost 300 000 IP addresses originating from Iran applied for access to Google via an illegally obtained digital certificate. The certificate was issued by DigiNotar, a Dutch digital certificate authority. The certificate was rescinded at the end of August, but not before potential damage was done. The IP address list will be handed over to Google so that the search company can inform its clients that a possible email interception occurred during this period. Alongside the emails, possible login cookies may also have been intercepted. Cookies can contain valuable information such as the online activities of the user, this...

  • A new age in cyber warfare — Anonymous, LulzSec and Stuxnet

    Growing up in the nineties, television and film made me believe that hackers could do anything. I pictured an emaciated Russian teenager typing on the keyboard of his multiple monitor display, green text scrolling down a black screen. Those scrawny fingers could assume identities or muddle up traffic lights. They were the dark practitioners of mysterious arts. Those were the early days of the web, though, when it was all still a bit wild west. It was before the September that never ended. The internet is supposed to be safe and established these days. Surely internet security experts,...

  • Iran’s plan for a second web

    Pop quiz: As an internet user, what is the world's worst country to live in? China with its Great Firewall comes to mind. Or perhaps Cuba, a country that until the end of Fidel Castro's reign in 2008 outlawed laptop computers and mobile phones. But it is in fact the Islamic Republic of Iran -- a country that is the biggest hellhole of internet censorship on the planet. How bad can it be? Well, in the wake of protests following the disputed presidential election on June 12, 2009, Iranian authorities declared all-out war on internet freedom. Intimidation tactics were employed...

  • US push for smash through the great firewall of China

    The United States plans to pump millions of dollars into new technology to break through internet censorship overseas amid a heightened crackdown on dissent in China, officials have said. US State Department officials said they would give US$19 million to efforts to evade internet controls in China, Iran and other authoritarian states which block online access to politically sensitive material. Michael Posner, the assistant secretary of state in charge of human rights, said...

  • ‘Operation Iran’ — Anonymous does not ‘forgive’

    Anonymous, the free-form leaderless internet hacker group has moved in the last year from its history of being "prankster" group with actions such as "Operation Titstorm", to an actual "group" that does present an actual (online) threat to those who come into its cross-hairs. The latest victim to fall in Anonymous' line of fire -- the Iranian government. The Iranian regime's opinion of the internet has always been pretty clear. In 2006 it...

  • Watch out internet it’s the ‘Iran-ternet’!

    Though the protests failed to overthrow the regime, it was in Iran that the true might of the internet as a tool for freedom was unleashed. In Iran the powers that be, led by controversial President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has had a somewhat less than warm view towards the internet. In light of the recent uprisings fueled, in some respect, by the internet Iran has decided to take the lead and create it's own internet. In 2006 Iranians were the second most tech-savvy population in the Middle-East region behind Israel. Conversely, as early as then, Reporters Without Borders had recognised the...

  • Tehran Post: ‘Cautiously speaking from inside Iran’

    Being the third largest blogging nation in the world after US and China, bloggers in Iran have in so many ways aroused curiosity. They have also commanded admiration for their drive for freedom of expression in an environment that is regarded as hostile to bloggers. Iranian bloggers have been thrown in jail for years and some unfortunately never return. Iranian bloggers still persist - in spite of the threats and hostility - in airing their views, passion and love for their country, culture and language. According to Wikipedia "with more than 700 000 Persian blogs, mostly based in Iran,...

  • Google software unblocked for Iranian citizens but not govt

    Since 2009, Google has been blocked from providing software downloads to Iran. However, Google announced on its blog that some of the US government's export controls and sanctions programs that prohibited software downloads to Iran have been lifted. The search giant has made mapping, photo-sharing, and Web browsing software available for the first time to people in Iran. "For the first time, we are making Google Earth, Picasa and Chrome available for download in Iran," Google export compliance programs manager Neil Martin said in a blog post. But restrictions on access to government computers remains, due to the fact that...