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All posts tagged "online security"

  • Kaspersky: manufacturing industry sees most cyber attacks in H1 2017

    Cybersecurity has been at the forefront of conversation for companies and individuals this year, especially in the wake of the Equifax hack, the Deloitte breach, and Yahoo's big revelation yesterday. But which industries are the most attacked? Kaspersky today issued its Threat Landscape for Industrial Automation Systems in H1 2017 report that revealed some notable worldwide internet security trends. Based on the company's findings, March was the most active month for cyber attacks so far. Kaspersky also claims its products blocked around 37.6% of attack attempts on ICS computers in the first half of 2017. "This figure was almost unchanged compared to the previous...

  • ‘All Yahoo user accounts’ were affected by 2013 hack

    When Yahoo announced that a billion users were affected by its 2013 hack, the internet weathered a collective cold sweat. But the story isn't quite done yet. The internet company's parent firm Oath today released "new intelligence" regarding the breach. "Subsequent to Yahoo's acquisition by Verizon, and during integration, the company recently obtained new intelligence and now believes, following an investigation with the assistance of outside forensic experts, that all Yahoo user accounts were affected by the August 2013 theft," Oath, also a subsidiary of Verizon, confirmed in a press release. That's three-billion users. While Oath confirmed that the orchestrators of the hack...

  • 3 ways employees can risk your firm’s cybersecurity (and what to do about it)

    Employees have been called the weakest link in a business's cybersecurity – a particularly notable problem in a time where high-profile hacks and ransomware attacks are on the rise. A favourite target of hackers is small-to-medium business – as they often have higher cash pools than individuals, but lack the cybersecurity of major institutions. But even if your cybersecurity is up to scratch, an employee who is unfamiliar with digital threats can cost you dearly. Here are three ways your employees can put your business cybersecurity at risk: Opening emails with malicious software While many people have wised up to the typical scams that...

  • Deloitte hit by cyber attack, emails possibly compromised

    According to a report by The Guardian, accounting and consulting giant Deloitte is today the latest global firm to succumb to a cyber attack. The firm had reportedly known about the breach since March 2017, but hackers may have been able to access data on Deloitte's systems since October 2016. By compromising an administrator account that lacked a two-factor authentication system, the attackers theoretically had "access to all areas", The Guardian notes. Along with emails from the company employees, the attackers may have been able to access usernames, passwords, IP addresses and other sensitive information stored as attachments. An administrator account lacking two-factor...

  • CCleaner came bundled with malware for a month and nobody noticed

    CCleaner -- a program usually used to clean Windows, Android and MacOS of errant software and data -- has itself been infected by a trojan. A new report by Talos suggests that for nearly a month the program's installer didn't just install Piriform's file cleaner, but rather additional malware. "For a period of time, the legitimate signed version of CCleaner 5.33 being distributed by Avast also contained a multi-stage malware payload that rode on top of the installation of CCleaner," the Talos team explains in a blog post. This malware was reportedly bundled with the program's install files located within Piriform's legitimate...

  • 143m Americans’ credit, personal data compromised due to Equifax breach

    Equifax, one of the US's largest consumer credit reporting agencies, today announced a breach of its digital security measures that could affect as many as 143-million Americans. That's close to half the country's population. The hack was first discovered by the company on 29 July, but took place between mid-May and July. "Criminals exploited a U.S. website application vulnerability to gain access to certain files," the company explains in a notice. "Based on the company’s investigation, the unauthorized access occurred from mid-May through July 2017. The company has found no evidence of unauthorized activity on Equifax’s core consumer or commercial credit reporting databases." The...

  • How to protect your child’s identity in an online world

    There are indications that identity theft syndicates are now targeting children. Common-sense practices, backed up by proper education, will save endless trouble down the line. In the online world, identity theft has become big business. People are remarkably careless about divulging personal information online, or storing it on unencrypted mobile or other digital devices. Criminals can use this information to open bank and store accounts and access state and other benefits unlawfully. Personal information like full names, birth date and parents’ names can be used to create an alias that stands up to most scrutiny. Worryingly, there are signs that identity thieves...

  • PhishNet sends mock-phishing emails to employees for the greater good

    Telecommunications company Internet Solutions (IS) has debuted a new service that allows security teams in companies to launch authentic phishing attacks on their colleagues, scaring them stiff and teaching them valuable lessons about cyber security. Dubbed PhishNet, the service aims to educate staffers about the nature, mechanics and calling cards of a phishing attack while providing the companies with data on their security practices and infrastructure. PhishNet's debut comes at a time when cyber security is paramount in media and mainstream conversation, following the recent WannaCry and Petya ransomware attacks. WannaCry in particular -- which infected more than 250 000 computers...

  • Amazon, WhatsApp score poorly in EFF’s annual privacy report

    When you sign up for the world's biggest services/apps, you're giving loads of information to these firms. But who can be trusted with your data? The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has released its annual "Who Has Your Back" report to answer this very question. The report grades some of the biggest companies in five categories, namely whether they follow best practices, tell users about government data requests, have a pro-user public policy, stand up to gag orders and promise not to sell out users. The worst offenders? US networks AT&T, Comcast, T-Mobile and Verizon all scored one star out of five -- a...

  • SA’s Dept of Education website hacked with ‘I love Islamic State’ message

    If you're trying to access South Africa's Department of Basic Education's website at present, you can't. It's down. And there's a very good reason why. The Department took to Twitter to announce that its site has been "hacked". Our website has been hacked👇🏿 pic.twitter.com/ROK4cQChLd — Dep. Basic Education (@DBE_SA) June 28, 2017 "A short while ago we discovered that the Department's website has been hacked," begins an attached press release, published around 9pm Wednesday. Things then get gruesome. "The people who breached the website have since posted gory pictures of decapitated corpses, some of whom are children." The presser didn't go into specifics, but it did...

  • Petya or NotPetya, this is the world’s latest ransomware attack

    Ransomware is yet again sweeping across the world's computers today, and no, it's not WannaCry. It goes by a few names, but it's being commonly referred to as Petya or NotPetya by security experts. While the former was first discovered in 2016, the latter name refers to a newer strain of the ransomware. Yesterday, Petya or a derivative, reappeared in Ukraine and has since spread to countries as far east as Australia, and as far West as the US. While details about the nature of the attack and the attackers' intentions are unclear at present, we do know a few key factors...

  • WannaCry ransomware now affecting Australia’s traffic cameras

    Remember WannaCry? The fearsome ransomware package that infected over 250 000 computers in 150 countries earlier this year? Well, it's back, but not in the way you might've been expecting. According to a report by The Guardian, around 55 traffic cameras in the Australian state of Victoria have been affected by the virus. While the cameras have been operating normally, notes the Victorian department of justice, those found to have been handed incorrect fines, they will be scratched from the system. How nice. In May 2017, WannaCry ripped through the world's unpatched Windows machines, locking users out of their devices and forcing them to...

  • ‘Judy’ malware found on Google Play Store puts 36.5m users at risk

    Just when you thought that WannaCry would be the last of the big malware attacks to plague 2017, a new breed of nasty has appeared on the Google Play Store. And its name is Judy. According to a report published by security company CheckPoint, Judy "is an auto-clicking adware which was found on 41 apps developed by a Korean company". The malware gets its name from the usual (and rather adorable) protagonist of the games fronting the malware. In one particular case, users can "create delicious food with Judy". Sounds yum. Cleverly bypassing Google Play's security measures by masquerading behind a legitimate app,...

  • Twitter knows an awful lot about you, it reveals in new privacy policy

    Tweet often? If so, there's a fat chance that Twitter knows an awful lot about you, your interests and even your lofty aspirations. This revelation comes after the company announced an upcoming revision to its privacy policy, which allows it to siphon more data about you from the web, and gives users more agency in their privacy options. If you're a mobile app user, you would've seen a pop up notifying you about this change. Heading to Twitter's blog though, the company outlined a more granular point-form summary of the changes heading to the platform in the coming weeks. In case you didn't...

  • Zomato hacked, 17m users’ personal data leaked to the dark web

    If you frequent the India-based restaurant and food review app Zomato, you should probably change your password immediately. That's the message conveyed in a blog post by the company on Thursday, after it announced that more than 10% of the company's user records were stolen by a hacker. "The reason you're reading this blog post is because of a recent discovery by our security team - about 17 million user records from our database were stolen. The stolen information has user email addresses and hashed passwords," it noted, adding over 120-million people visit Zomato monthly. For those who had their user information stolen,...