• BURN MEDIA
    • Motorburn
      Because cars are gadgets
    • Gearburn
      Incisive reviews for the gadget obsessed
    • Ventureburn
      Startup news for emerging markets
    • Jobsburn
      Digital industry jobs for the anti 9 to 5!

All posts tagged "online security"

  • WannaCry ransomware now affecting Australia’s traffic cameras

    Remember WannaCry? The fearsome ransomware package that infected over 250 000 computers in 150 countries earlier this year? Well, it's back, but not in the way you might've been expecting. According to a report by The Guardian, around 55 traffic cameras in the Australian state of Victoria have been affected by the virus. While the cameras have been operating normally, notes the Victorian department of justice, those found to have been handed incorrect fines, they will be scratched from the system. How nice. In May 2017, WannaCry ripped through the world's unpatched Windows machines, locking users out of their devices and forcing them to...

  • ‘Judy’ malware found on Google Play Store puts 36.5m users at risk

    Just when you thought that WannaCry would be the last of the big malware attacks to plague 2017, a new breed of nasty has appeared on the Google Play Store. And its name is Judy. According to a report published by security company CheckPoint, Judy "is an auto-clicking adware which was found on 41 apps developed by a Korean company". The malware gets its name from the usual (and rather adorable) protagonist of the games fronting the malware. In one particular case, users can "create delicious food with Judy". Sounds yum. Cleverly bypassing Google Play's security measures by masquerading behind a legitimate app,...

  • Twitter knows an awful lot about you, it reveals in new privacy policy

    Tweet often? If so, there's a fat chance that Twitter knows an awful lot about you, your interests and even your lofty aspirations. This revelation comes after the company announced an upcoming revision to its privacy policy, which allows it to siphon more data about you from the web, and gives users more agency in their privacy options. If you're a mobile app user, you would've seen a pop up notifying you about this change. Heading to Twitter's blog though, the company outlined a more granular point-form summary of the changes heading to the platform in the coming weeks. In case you didn't...

  • Zomato hacked, 17m users’ personal data leaked to the dark web

    If you frequent the India-based restaurant and food review app Zomato, you should probably change your password immediately. That's the message conveyed in a blog post by the company on Thursday, after it announced that more than 10% of the company's user records were stolen by a hacker. "The reason you're reading this blog post is because of a recent discovery by our security team - about 17 million user records from our database were stolen. The stolen information has user email addresses and hashed passwords," it noted, adding over 120-million people visit Zomato monthly. For those who had their user information stolen,...

  • Weekly Round Up Podcast #106: Google I/O & WannaCry ransomware

    This week, the trusty Hadlee Simons hosts Andy Walker and Stephen Timm. To start us off, Andy talks about WannaCry, the worldwide attack involving ransomware that targeted over 230 000 computers. The Windows attack even managed to hit the UK's National Health Service. The team then discuss General Motors pulling out of South Africa, and other international locations. Isuzu will be taking over GM’s light commercial vehicle manufacturing facilities in Port Elizabeth. Over on Ventureburn, Stephen talks about the GEM report that significantly fewer South Africans believe they have either the opportunity or the capability to start their own business. The report also...

  • Edward Snowden reminds us all that he was right after WannaCry fallout

    It's hard being right all the time, especially if you're Edward Snowden. The infamous whistleblower who curently calls Russia home spoke on Monday via video link at a Washington DC security conference. And he just couldn't help reminding everyone that the NSA sucks. "They knew about this flaw in U.S. software, U.S. infrastructure, hospitals around the world, these auto plants and so on and so forth, but they did not report it to Microsoft until after the NSA learned that that flaw had been stolen by some outside group," the former CIA contractor noted, according to a Newsweek transcript. WannaCry infected over 300...

  • Could WannaCry ransomware be linked to North Korea?

    WannaCry, the ransomware package that wreaked havoc across the world's Windows machinery this past weekend, might have links to North Korea, security experts revealed. The ransomware swept across the world last Friday, infecting over a quarter-million Windows machines across 150 countries. It remains a threat, but infection rates have somewhat slowed. According to a report published by Reuters, South Korean security researchers found coding similarities in WannaCry's earlier versions, and a different malware used by the Lazarus Group -- a hacking collective with ties to North Korea. These findings have also been noted by Google security researcher Neel Mehta, Symantec and Kaspersky. Shared...

  • 3 hilarious (but scary) printer security stories from the internet [Native]

    Printers might seem like innocuous little office gadgets that do one job and one job alone, but they've become more vulnerable thanks to the internet. While human beings' reliance on the web expands, so does the ability for baddies to crack their security protocols. With that in mind, here are three previous moments in history that printers were the victims of rather comical, if not potentially catastrophic, security stories. -> YOUR PRINTER HAS BEEN PWNED <- In February 2017, a hacker using the alias Stackoverflowin took control of over 150 000 printers across the globe to probe a point. And to distribute memes. Although...

  • Two-factor authentication is now live on Instagram

    Keeping pace with its contemporaries, Instagram now supports two-factor authentication. The system "adds an extra layer of security to your Instagram account by requiring a code every time you log in", announced company CEO Kevin Systrom in a blog post. "Tap the gear icon on your profile and choose Two-Factor Authentication to turn it on." This effectively means that those looking to infiltrate your account (and post pictures of dirty dishes, or unkempt gardens) can't simply use your password. Two-factor authentication, in essence, makes it damn difficult to crack users' accounts. The system has been adopted by a number of other services, including...

  • WhatsApp flaw lets hackers take over accounts in seconds

    WhatsApp and Telegram's online platforms had a bug that allowed hackers to take full control of anyone's account by sending a simple image to a user. Check Point Software researchers revealed in a blog post yesterday that if hackers had exploited the hack, they would have been in control of all the victims' conversations, photos, files and contact lists. "This means that attackers could potentially download your photos and or post them online, send messages on your behalf, demand ransom, and even take over your friends’ accounts," the blog reads. According to Check Point, the source of the issue was the end-to-end encryption...

  • Verified Twitter accounts post swastikas in Turkish hack

    Last week, the Netherlands barred two Turkish ministers from speaking to expatriates ahead of a national memorandum. On 16 April, Turkey will be voting whether or not to allow Turkish President Erdogan to stay in power until 2029. And the president did not take the slight well: according to Fortune.com, Turkey warned that it would retaliate in the "harshest ways." Apparently these ways include Twitter hacks. Last night, Turkish hackers targeted verified accounts to spew Erdogan propaganda across the platform. Rough translation: “#NaziGermany👌#NaziNetherlands, a little👋#OTTOMAN SLAP for you, see you on #April16th. Can’t read it🇹🇷LEARN Turkish #RT” — Alex Hern (@alexhern) March 15, 2017 Hundreds of accounts were...

  • Ster-Kinekor website leaked millions of users’ private data

    Ster-Kinekor's old website allowed anyone with know-how to retrieve the profile details of every user on the site. This information included phone numbers, addresses and plaintext passwords. Software developer Matt Cavanagh revealed the bug in a blog post on Thursday, after disclosing it to Ster Kinekor last year. "They took the high-road of admitting they were at fault, and didn't try pass the blame off. I appreciate that," Cavanagh told Memeburn of their response to his report. According to the developer, the bug in the backend API was found via the website's Flash bits. He admits he didn't have substantial knowledge of Flash, but...

  • Cloudflare bug leaks personal information to search engines

    US Internet giant Cloudflare revealed yesterday that a bug in its coding had put many users' sensitive information at risk. Google Zero engineer Travis Ormandy was the first to notice the mishap, and immediately tweeted a request to talk with someone from Cloudflare's security department. Could someone from cloudflare security urgently contact me. — Tavis Ormandy (@taviso) February 18, 2017 Ormandy had noticed that corrupted web pages were being returned from HTTP requests run through Cloudflare. When alerted, the company immediately noticed the problem was being caused by three minor features and shut them down before going about fixing the issue. At its peak, data...

  • Twitter is cracking down on harassment again with ‘low-quality replies’

    Twitter never seems to get it right when it comes to online safety on its platform. The site has fought many a battle against users worried they aren't doing enough to combat hate speech and harassment. After implementing a few changes in November, the site this week announced that it has rolled out even more in an attempt to create a safer platform for all. The changes implemented include safer search results (which will no longer feature blocked or muted accounts), as well as keeping "low-quality replies" away from the top of threads. The bulk of the criticism lobbied against the...

  • Personal information in the age of social media

    The global reaction to WhatsApp’s August 2016 announcement, in which the “updating” of its terms and privacy policy was revealed, has been interesting. This update, essentially, allows for the sharing of user information between WhatsApp and its owner of roughly two years, Facebook. The reaction has been largely alarmist. The Guardian, Independent, and The Telegraph warn users to opt out of the sharing of information between the two platforms. TechCrunch takes a more balanced approach, outlining the European legislative response to the announcement, and quoting the UK’s information commissioner Elizabeth Denham. According to Denham: “There’s a lot of anger out there....