• BURN MEDIA
    • Motorburn
      Because cars are gadgets
    • Gearburn
      Incisive reviews for the gadget obsessed
    • Ventureburn
      Startup news for emerging markets
    • Jobsburn
      Digital industry jobs for the anti 9 to 5!

All posts tagged "online security"

  • Two-factor authentication is now live on Instagram

    Keeping pace with its contemporaries, Instagram now supports two-factor authentication. The system "adds an extra layer of security to your Instagram account by requiring a code every time you log in", announced company CEO Kevin Systrom in a blog post. "Tap the gear icon on your profile and choose Two-Factor Authentication to turn it on." This effectively means that those looking to infiltrate your account (and post pictures of dirty dishes, or unkempt gardens) can't simply use your password. Two-factor authentication, in essence, makes it damn difficult to crack users' accounts. The system has been adopted by a number of other services, including...

  • WhatsApp flaw lets hackers take over accounts in seconds

    WhatsApp and Telegram's online platforms had a bug that allowed hackers to take full control of anyone's account by sending a simple image to a user. Check Point Software researchers revealed in a blog post yesterday that if hackers had exploited the hack, they would have been in control of all the victims' conversations, photos, files and contact lists. "This means that attackers could potentially download your photos and or post them online, send messages on your behalf, demand ransom, and even take over your friends’ accounts," the blog reads. According to Check Point, the source of the issue was the end-to-end encryption...

  • Verified Twitter accounts post swastikas in Turkish hack

    Last week, the Netherlands barred two Turkish ministers from speaking to expatriates ahead of a national memorandum. On 16 April, Turkey will be voting whether or not to allow Turkish President Erdogan to stay in power until 2029. And the president did not take the slight well: according to Fortune.com, Turkey warned that it would retaliate in the "harshest ways." Apparently these ways include Twitter hacks. Last night, Turkish hackers targeted verified accounts to spew Erdogan propaganda across the platform. Rough translation: “#NaziGermany👌#NaziNetherlands, a little👋#OTTOMAN SLAP for you, see you on #April16th. Can’t read it🇹🇷LEARN Turkish #RT” — Alex Hern (@alexhern) March 15, 2017 Hundreds of accounts were...

  • Ster-Kinekor website leaked millions of users’ private data

    Ster-Kinekor's old website allowed anyone with know-how to retrieve the profile details of every user on the site. This information included phone numbers, addresses and plaintext passwords. Software developer Matt Cavanagh revealed the bug in a blog post on Thursday, after disclosing it to Ster Kinekor last year. "They took the high-road of admitting they were at fault, and didn't try pass the blame off. I appreciate that," Cavanagh told Memeburn of their response to his report. According to the developer, the bug in the backend API was found via the website's Flash bits. He admits he didn't have substantial knowledge of Flash, but...

  • Cloudflare bug leaks personal information to search engines

    US Internet giant Cloudflare revealed yesterday that a bug in its coding had put many users' sensitive information at risk. Google Zero engineer Travis Ormandy was the first to notice the mishap, and immediately tweeted a request to talk with someone from Cloudflare's security department. Could someone from cloudflare security urgently contact me. — Tavis Ormandy (@taviso) February 18, 2017 Ormandy had noticed that corrupted web pages were being returned from HTTP requests run through Cloudflare. When alerted, the company immediately noticed the problem was being caused by three minor features and shut them down before going about fixing the issue. At its peak, data...

  • Twitter is cracking down on harassment again with ‘low-quality replies’

    Twitter never seems to get it right when it comes to online safety on its platform. The site has fought many a battle against users worried they aren't doing enough to combat hate speech and harassment. After implementing a few changes in November, the site this week announced that it has rolled out even more in an attempt to create a safer platform for all. The changes implemented include safer search results (which will no longer feature blocked or muted accounts), as well as keeping "low-quality replies" away from the top of threads. The bulk of the criticism lobbied against the...

  • Personal information in the age of social media

    The global reaction to WhatsApp’s August 2016 announcement, in which the “updating” of its terms and privacy policy was revealed, has been interesting. This update, essentially, allows for the sharing of user information between WhatsApp and its owner of roughly two years, Facebook. The reaction has been largely alarmist. The Guardian, Independent, and The Telegraph warn users to opt out of the sharing of information between the two platforms. TechCrunch takes a more balanced approach, outlining the European legislative response to the announcement, and quoting the UK’s information commissioner Elizabeth Denham. According to Denham: “There’s a lot of anger out there....

  • Is TrackOFF the internet security service you’ve been sorely missing?

    With so much talk about hacking, identity theft and online fraud floating around in 2017, we'll totally understand if you never want to switch on a computer ever again. Luckily, there are ways to make your online journey a little safer. Browser add-ons, anti-virus programs and common sense are just some of the ways you can filter out -- and avoid -- the gunk from online pages you visit everyday. But some companies believe this isn't quite enough. That's where TrackOFF comes into play. The Baltimore-based security company claims to build the "best in class tools to secure users' identities and personal...

  • Your Android Pattern Lock isn’t secure at all, research suggests

    Modern Android devices give users a number of authentication methods. From fingerprints to PIN codes, there are a slew of options to unlock your dear device. But some people still rely on the ancient Pattern Lock. Researchers from Britain's universities of Bath and Lancaster, and China's Northwest University, suggest that sliding your thumb seemingly uniquely across nine equidistant dots on a screen isn't as secure as you may have thought. The researchers noted that by using a recorded "video and computer vision algorithm software" -- effectively recording the motion of the hand over the screen -- the Pattern Lock can be...

  • Ransomware: 9 best security practices your company should apply

    Ransomware. Today, one of the most wide-spread and damaging threats that internet users and organisations face. In short, it is a type of malware (malicious software) designed by cyber criminals to block access to a computer or system until a sum of money is paid. In true cyber war talk, it keeps the computer ransom. How does it happen? There are two main ways that a ransomware attack starts: it either happens via an email with a malicious attachment, or by visiting a compromised (often a legitimate, mainstream) website. Malicious email: Today’s cyber criminals are crafting emails that are indistinguishable from genuine...

  • FriendFinder Networks: 412m accounts hacked in 2016’s biggest breach

    Another adult dating company has been hacked, but this time it's FriendFinder. According to breach notification portal LeakedSource, details of around 412-million accounts have made their way into the darkest parts of the web. Notably, the sites affected include AdultFriendFinder (with around 300-million accounts), Cams.com (with another 60-million), and other accounts from the likes of Penthouse and Stripshow. In total, a quite ridiculous 412 214 295 accounts have been compromised, making this the biggest hack of the year so far. Warning signs Notably, warning signs of a possible breach emerged in October 2016 from an anonymous security researcher. FriendFinder Network's VP noted that the company...

  • Opera: OLX, Letgo tracks you more than Takealot, Gumtree

    New research from Opera Software found that over half of the top 60 Android shopping apps collect personal information via trackers. However, South Africa's OLX and Letgo were mentioned as some of the worst offenders as well. The two South African services were joined by the likes of Flipkart, Amazon, JC Penney, Best Buy and eBay Kleinanzeigen as the shopping apps with the highest amount of trackers. These trackers collected information such as your name, email address, location, phone number and search terms, Opera wrote in an emailed press release. The results were obtained using privacy mode in the updated Opera Max...

  • EFF: 4 big security concerns for WhatsApp

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has been on WhatsApp's case this year, taking the platform to task over its new data-sharing policy with Facebook. Now, the US watchdog has hit out at WhatsApp, listing four major security concerns it should tackle. Unencrypted backups The first issue raised by the EFF was the way WhatsApp handles backups to the cloud. "In order to back messages up in a way that makes them restorable without a passphrase in the future, these backups need to be stored unencrypted at rest," the watchdog noted. The watchdog says users should never back up their WhatsApp data to the cloud "since...

  • Employees download malware every four seconds

    A new pair of studies reveals that employees are downloading unknown malware at a staggering rate. The Check Point 2016 Security Report and the SANS 2016 Threat Landscape Study revealed "critical challenges" facing businesses, Check Point wrote in an emailed press statement. The Check Point report saw the company analyse the activity of 31 000 Check Point "gateways" around the world. The SANS study, on the other hand, saw 300 IT security professionals being surveyed. "Researchers found a 9x increase in the amount of unknown malware plaguing businesses. This was fuelled by the employees -- who downloaded a new unknown malware every four...

  • FBI chief suggests you tape over your webcam

    People might call you paranoid if you encrypt your smartphone, or boast an endless array of 12+ character passwords, but new comments made by the FBI chief James Comey's webcam comments will make you feel a little more normal. Comey, while speaking at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, called taping over your laptop's webcam -- to prevent potential prying eyes from snooping -- one of the "sensible things" human beings should be doing, akin to locking your house, or patting your wallet before disembarking the plane. "You go into any government office and we all have the little camera...