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Design

  • #Anotherlightup: tweet and donate to illuminate public art (and a township)

    What do a graffiti artist, Twitter, a design conference and a South African township have in common? They're all part of #anotherlightup -- the latest social media-fuelled campaign hoping to make a difference through the power of public art and crowdfunding. Launched at this year's Design Indaba, the #Anotherlightup project is hoping to raise funds to install 80 street lights along a 700 metre path between public water points in Monwabisi Park. It aims to make the neighbourhood safer by ensuring these frequently visited spaces are well-lit at night -- especially considering the area sees a spike in crime...

  • Adobe DPS now powers over 75% of mobile digital reading

    Adobe Digital Publishing Suite (DPS) -- a codeless app generator for publications -- now powers more than three-quarters of all digital issues consumed on mobile devices, Adobe has revealed. Newly unveiled data from Adobe shows that DPS -- which releases publications compatible with iOS, Android Tablets, and Kindle Fire -- seems to be driving the growth of digital reading, increasing both circulation and reader engagement for notable publications such as Wired, Time, National Geographic and GQ, amongst others. Since Adobe DPS was released less than three years ago, thousands of publications have taken it on to power their digital offerings --...

  • All flat and Instagrammed: Shutterstock’s 2014 global design trends

    What would you do if you were one of the world's top stock image sites, with users generating a terabyte of data a day? If you're smart, you'd put all that information to good use... and maybe make an infographic to go along with it. Well, that's exactly what Shutterstock has done with the most recent iteration of their global design trends report. The stock image and video site put crunched the numbers to give an overview of major current influences in the world of design, taking into account over 350-million downloads of its stock imagery and information on...

  • 6 reasons why your website needs to be conversion-driven

    When you walk into a retail clothing store, you’re not just walking into a room randomly filled with garments. You’re entering a carefully organised space specifically designed to get you to buy products. Items from the newest range take pride of place while images of gorgeous models flaunting the items plaster the biggest walls. The perfect jacket to compliment that pair of skinny jeans is displayed nearby, with a helpful shopping assistant on hand to suggest you try them both. Special deals displayed at eye level catch your eye on the way out. These are all important tricks of the...

  • Starting a website? Tips on going niche, working smart and growing fast [WCCT]

    If you’re looking for examples of niche, it’s difficult to imagine a slimmer area of focus than one page websites. But it’s an interest in that specific area that has helped Cape Town-based developer and WordPress fan Rob Hope expand a side-project into a fulltime commitment, driven by the allure of the focused and inspiring. Hope is the man behind One Page Love – a design platform which highlights, reviews and showcases the stories behind single page websites. It’s a niche in modern web design, and one which is becoming a serious trend Hope has capitalised on. His site...

  • Young graduate looks to crowdfund innovative newwheel design

    We get told about crowdfunded ideas all the time here at Memeburn. Some of them are cool, some seem pretty pointless, but every now and then we see one that looks like the start of something incredible. The project, currently being funded on Indiegogo, is called Roadless and is meant to be a a wheel system that can be adapted to suit different terrain conditions. According to the Indiegogo page, the wheel system addresses the absence of transportation services found in rural farming communities caused by the lack of or inadequate transportation infrastructure. Its founder, who goes by the name...

  • Wireframing is out, prototyping is in: here’s why

    OK, so it is a bit of an inflammatory title for an article, but I think for a lot of web development projects, it is now true. A few years ago, the standard process for building a decently complex website involved an initial stage of producing wireframes. These were generally static, greyscale 'blueprints' for the layout of the website, illustrating where content would be positioned, what kind of UI (User Interface) elements are to be used, and how data will be input by users, and displayed when output. It's conceptually an essential part of a successful website development project,...

  • Check out this designer’s gorgeous re-imagining of Twitter

    Twitter's not afraid of big changes. There have been several "new" Twitters over the years, but what if the social network was completely re-imagined? What might it look like? Thanks to Australian designer Fred Nerby, we have an idea. Nerby, whose version of Facebook went viral earlier this year, has turned his attention to the 140 character or less social network and the results are pretty damn spectacular. The design isn't just a re-tooling of the social network to make it look a little prettier either. Nerby's actually thought about what would make Twitter better and how to push...

  • 2 very good reasons why a smart designer is essential to any website

    It’s been said that the worst mistake a company can make when they need to build a website is to leave it to a web designer. But of course somebody who designs websites is by definition a website designer in much the same way as a pilot flies planes or a writer writes articles. What’s more we all know that the worst mistake a company can make is potentially much more catastrophic than hiring a web designer. But I digress. If we take it as given that a web designer is somebody who designs websites for a living, here are the...

  • Elon Musk’s Hyperloop transport system not a vacuum tunnel, here’s all we know

    A simple tweet is all it took. Elon Musk, tech billionaire and founder of Tesla Motors and SpaceX, has sent the tech world into giddy excitement by announcing the date that he will reveal early designs of his much-anticipated Hyperloop transport system. Will publish Hyperloop alpha design by Aug 12. Critical feedback for improvements would be much appreciated.— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) July 15, 2013 At this stage no one knows 100% what the Hyperloop system is, or how it works, but it could be a direct rival to the planned California bullet-train that will travel the 343 miles (552km) between...

  • 7 reasons a designer shouldn’t take responsibility for your site

    When you need a website, most companies will try to find a graphic designer, web designer or simply brief their advertising agency. This is the worst mistake a company can make as designers have the wrong priorities when it comes to web design. To get the best results when looking at web design you need to get someone in marketing to do your website design. The number one priority of marketing types is to generate revenue, and this should always be the number one priority of your website design. Here are the main reasons why you cannot trust a designer...

  • Adobe kills Creative Suite, moves to service-based Creative Cloud

    Adobe Creative Suite is no longer a product. It's a service. What was once just an option, will become the only way to access the Adobe Creative Suite family of applications come 17 June. Creative Suite (CS) will officially be replaced by Adobe Creative Cloud (CC), a subscription-based service with all the bells and whistles that come with the cloud. Announced at Adobe's MAX conference, and received with mixed reactions across social media platforms, the move marks Adobe's official shift from a product-driven company to a service-driven one after experimenting with it for the last two years. This means that...

  • The future of furniture is here: it’s the self assembling foam chair

    The future of furniture is approaching fast as designer Carl de Smet from Noumenon plans on manufacturing a foam chair which can be compressed to five percent of its original size. This initiative works with polyurethane shape-memory polymers (SMPs) to compress chairs and other pieces of furniture into flat slabs that can be easily stowed and moved until they are ready to be used. The polymers are the key chemical compound in the manufacturing of the fixtures. Smet makes these pieces (in this case a chair) in its original form. Through applying heat, the polymer bonds loosen, enabling the...

  • Engineering the Internet of Things, ‘climate responsive’ tech and serendipity

    All tech giants seem to be redesigning and creating newer, smarter campuses. Google, Apple, Microsoft and Yahoo have been undergoing changes to their employees’ work spaces by engineering a ‘smarter’ work environment that could increase creativity and productivity. "Smart buildings will become smart cities," Microsoft's Darrel Smith says. "And smart cities will change everything." Many companies rely on what is called ‘living buildings’ having designed the structure in order to promote as many chance meetings as possible in order to promote creativity. Others rely on green, sustainable tech or even 'data blankets' used to analyse environments through sensors. Berlin’s flughafen...

  • The human body as interface, and a new language of interaction

    As it stands, we have moved through a few core paradigms in terms of how we interact with computers and software. From the earliest days of physical levers and punchcards, through text (DOS etc.), onto the GUI and windows/Mac OS type interfaces, and recently now touch, gesture and voice. These last three have signaled a major shift towards a more natural way of interacting -- making use of the kinds of behaviours we understand intuitively, either because we have evolved to perform them, or because we learn them from a young age, as useful behaviours in a range of...