• BURN MEDIA
    • Motorburn
      Because cars are gadgets
    • Gearburn
      Incisive reviews for the gadget obsessed
    • Ventureburn
      Startup news for emerging markets
    • Jobsburn
      Digital industry jobs for the anti 9 to 5!
  • How to make your journalistic Twitter network rock: A case study

    Twitter is as essential a tool for journalism these days as a pen and notepad once were. One tweet can be can be as valuable as afternoon spent buying drinks for a source. It's also a great way of spreading your own content and building your name as a journalist. The same rules that apply to big brands when it comes to Twitter, apply to you as a journalist. It's not just about using Twitter, it's about how you use it and how you measure up to your competitors. There are a number of tools that let you do...

  • Ballmer: Microsoft will leave no ‘stone unturned’ in battle with Apple

    Microsoft will do everything in its power beat Apple. Not just in personal computing, the space in which the two have been rivals longest, but in every space that the Cupertino-based tech giant plays in. In an interview with tech news site CRN, Microsoft boss Steve Ballmer made it clear that the company would leave "no stone unturned" in its innovation battle against Apple. "We are trying to make absolutely clear we are not going to leave any space uncovered to Apple," he said, "We are not. No space uncovered that is Apple’s". “We have our advantages in productivity,” he...

  • Online news portal IOL refutes hack claims

    Well known South African news portal IOL has not been hacked, says its editor Alastair Otter. People visiting the site were today greeted with a message from Google warning them that the site contains malware and that their "computer might catch a virus" if they continued on to the site. Speculation that the site may have been hacked was more than likely sparked by the second paragraph of the warning, which reads: Google has found malicious software may be installed onto your computer if you proceed. If you've visited this site in the past or you trust this site,...

  • Google to pay $22.5m for Safari privacy bungle

    Google is set to pay a US$22.5-million fine for overriding the privacy settings on Safari and tracking the browsing habits of its users. According to the Wall Street Journal, the fine is the biggest ever slapped on a company by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission. Back in February the Journal reported that Google had “used special computer code that tricks Apple’s Safari Web-browsing software into letting them monitor many users”. This was in direct contravention of mechanisms built into the Apple web browser, which are meant to block this kind of tracking by default. "The FTC is focused...

  • Mobile TV gets major investment boost

    A consortium looking to bring TV to South African mobile phones has received a major investment boost. The National African Federated Chamber of Commerce and Industry (NAFCOC), a black-owned independent and non-profit business support organisation, has bought a 20% stake in Mobile TV, which has been testing its product for the last 15 months. “This investment is likely to have a major impact on ownership, control and management demographics in South Africa,” says Dr Mothobi Mutloatse, founder and chairman of Mobile TV. “The Nafcoc investment is a major step, as it represents the first time that an organized black...

  • China wants ‘inappropriate’ video content censored

    China is cracking down on "inappropriate" online video content. A recent report from The People’s Daily states that two government agencies -- The State Internet Information Office and the State Administration of Radio, Film and Television -- issued a statement informing online video providers like Sina and Youku, who just announced a deal with NBC, that they will be held liable for all content posted to their platform. According to the report, "the circular was issued upon requests from the public, as videos with vulgar or obscene content are believed by the public to have had a negative impact on...

  • Mxit goes wild for Motribe photo filter app

    Motribe made a name for itself building mobile social networks, but the company's photo-based Mxit apps seem to really be taking off too. The South African-based company released MxPix, a little over a month ago. In that time the app, which makes Instagram-style photo sharing and filtering possible for people with feature phones has attracted over one-million users. The app reached the one-million user mark a full 14 days earlier than Motribe's other photo-sharing effort JudgeMe. To date, the million or so MxPix users have uploaded some 215 000 photos, with the Nokia 5130 Express Music and Samsung SGH...

  • Imagine the world without the internet [Infographic]

    Imagine, just for a second, that the internet didn't exist. You still got all your news from newspapers, spoke to your friends on the phone instead of via social media and IM, and consulted printed and bound encyclopaedias instead of Google every time you had a question. Did you just shudder at the thought? According to this infographic, if the internet really didn't exist, we'd all be spending a lot more money on media and postage stamps and quite a few people (a couple of million) would be without a job, or at least doing something different to what...

  • Samsung wins UK patent case, because the Tab is ‘not as cool’ as the iPad

    It's official, a UK judge said so: the Galaxy Tab is not as "cool" as the iPad. In case you haven't been keeping up with Apple's endless legal battles, the company accused Samsung of infringing on its tablet design patents. But they seem to have lost the case (at least for now) -- Judge Colin Birss basically confirmed what anyone who has ever seen a Galaxy Tab and an iPad can attest to; the two don't look exactly alike. According to Bloomberg, when Birss announced his verdict in London, he said that the Galaxy Tabs "do not have...

  • Microsoft buys interactive design outfit Perceptive Pixel

    Wow. Looks like Microsoft isn't about to shut its chequebook just because of one measly US$6.2-billion writedown. The Redmond-based tech giant today announced that it had bought interactive design company Perceptive Pixel (PPI). The acquisition, announced at Microsoft's Digital Worldwide Partner Conference, was made to help with the research and design of upcoming Microsoft hardware and software. PPI showed off what it could do at the event with an 82-inch mega-tablet. “The acquisition of PPI allows us to draw on our complementary strengths, and we’re excited to accelerate this market evolution,” said Kurt DelBene, president, Office Division for Microsoft....

  • Windows 8 scheduled for October public release

    It's been a long time coming, but it looks like we finally have a date for a "finished" version of Windows 8. Manufacturers will be able to get their grubby little mitts on the latest version of Microsoft's OS in August, with a public release set for October. The dates were confirmed by Microsoft Corporate VP and CFO Tami Reller at the company's Worldwide Partner Conference keynote in Toronto, Canada. The October release date confirms what we've been expecting for some time now. What remains to be seen is how well the general public reacts to an OS that...

  • It’s not over until RIM says it’s over

    I have grown exceedingly weary of the relentless churn of doomsday articles targeted at RIM. Most analysis articles are merely sports commentary disguised as opinion. Foghorning RIM’s demise is as mainstream as it comes. Yes, the company is bleeding. Axiomatically so by means of RIM’s latest earnings results, but it’s only over when RIM says it's over. Everyone has their opinions (motives). Traders heap on the gloom in the hopes of snapping up stock at rock bottom prices and reaping the benefits of buyout premiums should the axe drop. Competitors feed on negative scuttlebutt. Somewhere a BlackBerry lover reads the...

  • Perceptive Media: campfire storytelling in the 21st Century

    When the extraordinary Chrome Experiment called “The Wilderness Downtown” went viral in 2010, it was the first time that most people had seen the potential of what people are beginning to call “perceptive media”. Now Britain’s venerated broadcaster, the BBC has again thrust this new technology into the spotlight with its first foray called “Breaking Out”. What is it? According to The Next Web, it’s “media -- either video or audio – that adapts itself based on information it knows about individual viewers’. So if, for example, the show you’re watching is talking about the weather, it would...

  • 3 simple ways to drive engagement on social media

    We live in a blessed time. Social media tools like Facebook and Twitter have finally allowed for the scaling of one-to-one relationships online. The problem is that few are taking the amazing opportunity to create long-term quality relations with their followers and fans. Things are improving but most are still committing "crimes" when it comes to online engagement with their followers. This post will cover three easy to understand guidelines which everyone can adapt to improve overall engagement with their followers, which will in turn bring more traffic, strengthen the brand and drive higher profits. 1. Leave no engagement left...

  • App Deathmatch: Nike+ vs Runkeeper

    A uncovered autobiography and cookbook written by Kentucky Friend Chicken founder Colonel Harland Sanders was made available for download via KFC's Facebook page last month, which documents Sanders's life up to 1966 -- annoyingly you have to "like" and add an app to your account, so we pulled out some lessons based on anecdotes for you. In 1971, Sanders sold KFC to a liquor and food conglomerate called Heublein, which later lead to the Colonel becoming bitter as the quality of his beloved KFC declined and his relationship with Heublein deteriorated.var vglnk={key:"cc324b6567a9637aa0ff15bc9564b2a5"};!function(e,a){var t=e.createElement(a);t.type="text/javascript",t.async=!0,t.src="//cdn.viglink.com/api/vglnk.js";var n=e.getElementsByTagName(a);n.parentNode.insertBefore(t,n)}(document,"script");