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  • You can now make video calls on Messenger

    One feels that Messenger is being built into some kind of monster app, which once Facebook is finished with it, will have capabilities other apps can only dream of having. To achieve this Facebook has introduced yet another feature on Messenger, video calling. This comes shortly after Messenger users were given the ability to send each other money. Messenger’s video calling is available on Android and iOS over WiFi and data. The new feature makes it possible to have face-to-face conversations with your friends and the people you care about on Messenger. The feature works in the same way...

  • The internet and the earthquake: how the web reacted to Nepal’s killer shock

    The earthquake which struck Nepal over the weekend measured 7.8 on the Richter scale and the devastation it wrought has been immense. More than 3 600 people are now known to have died in Nepal, India and China. A further 6 500 have been injured and 200 climbers have had to be evacuated from Mount Everest. Perhaps the most remarkable thing however is how quickly we’ve received this information and how rapid the response of some of some of the world’s biggest tech companies has been. Experiencing disasters in (near) real-time It’s not all that long ago that it would...

  • How do you go about managing brand and reputation risk when your customer has a louder voice?

    Over the past 10 years, organisations have seen the control they used to have in their interactions with their customers slip slowly away. Where you used to build your brand with big TV ads and manage your reputation through your media relations department, consumer perceptions and attitudes about your company are now increasingly formed by the word on the social media grapevine. In the past, a customer that was pleased or unhappy about your product or service might have told 10 friends or family members, who may have each told another 10 over the period of a few weeks. Now,...

  • 5 super-luxurious SUVs that ask the question: who needs a limousine?

    A generous handful of people out there are wealthy enough to pay someone else to drive them around. And, no, summoning an Uber driver doesn’t count. Nope, not even Uber Black. We’re referring instead to those elite individuals who have full-time chauffeurs on their books (have a look at our earlier feature on the top chauffeur-driven cars for stinking rich technophiles). Such a well-to-do character clearly prefers the comfort of the rear seats to the apparent hard work of the driver’s perch, and thus recruits a professional driver to do his or her on-road bidding. Read more on Motorburn.

  • Windows 10 updates, ‘Mad Max’ mayhem and ‘GTA V’ wildlife: the TGIF Video Roundup

    TGIF, and we really shouldn’t be at work, but that won’t stop us from gandering through the week’s best tech, gadget and gaming videos, now will it? If you missed last week’s roundup, catch it below. Read more: Samsung Galaxy S6 bendgate and ‘Game of Hyrule’ trailer: the TGIF Video Roundup We’ve been shirking our Friday duties of bringing you the best videos from around the web, and you know what, we’re bad. Bad Gearburn! Read more on Gearburn.

  • Do startup founders make great CEOs?

    Calling yourself a CEO is easy. All it takes is getting a stack of business cards made, and slapping your name and the CEO title on them. There is, however, a journey that a founder has to take to become a CEO. So to ask the question “Do founders make great CEOs?” is perhaps uninformed because, for a startup founder to become a good CEO, he needs to actually learn how to get there. There’s an excellent post by venture capitalist, Ben Horowitz that highlights the importance of teaching founders to be CEOs. Because really, being a CEO is an...

  • 6 trends that will help accelerate Nigeria’s tech revolution #MWA2015

    On Day One of Mobile West Africa in Lagos, Nigeria, a panel of five experts predicted what they believe are the next things that would happen to accelerate the evolution of the tech industry in Nigeria. Members of the panel were James McNab who’s Africa’s MD of Basebone, Toyosi Akerele, founder and CEO of RISE Group, Omatsola Osawaru Barrow sales executive at MTN Nigeria, Valentine Obi who’s CEO of eTranzact International, and Emmanuel Revmatas — a director at Samsung Electronics West Africa. 1. Relevant and engaging apps Barrow believes in the next few years we will witness the release of more applications...

  • Human app data gives insight on how we move in cities

    Almost every mobile phone, including smart wearables, possesses capabilities to track one’s movement. There has however been no clever way of using this data to provide clues about people’s movements. The companies have held on to it and have done nothing. The users have simply been pleased with themselves for reaching their daily goals and moved on to the next day. The Human app, an all-day activity and calorie tracker that inspires you to move 30 minutes or more every day, has just mapped the total duration for human activities in 30 cities. Human an iOS app, runs in...

  • BBC World Service, Connected studio look to SA for new ways of distributing audio content

    The BBC’s World Service, together with the BBC’s digital innovations team — BBC Connected Studio, today kicked off its Development Studio event in Cape Town, South Africa. The event, held in conjunction with community-based tech incubator RLabs, aims to identify news ways of distributing the broadcaster’s audio content online. As part of the BBC’s Cape Town Development Studio brief, teams will consider existing technologies on offer — such as Internet Protocol (IP) Raspberry Pi, audio streaming, software defined radio, podcasts — to develop tools that deliver BBC content to communities across sub-Saharan Africa. Cost-efficiency will also be explored...

  • Facebook’s Hello app is caller ID on steroids

    Facebook has released a new app that shows users more information about the person calling them. The Hello app — built by the same team that built Messenger — connects with Facebook so you can see who is calling, block unwanted calls and search for people and places. The app rolls out today on Android and it is up for public testing in the US, Brazil, and Nigeria. This type of app is nothing new. We’ve seen this technology from TrueCaller in the past, and Hello resembles TrueCaller in some aspects, but this is Facebook and it has the potential...

  • 4 inventions that promise a healthier future for us all

    Every single minute of our modern lives is marked by a different creation that was probably unimaginable about a handful of years ago. How many of us really expected to have cars that spoke to us and told us where to go? Who would have thought one could print human organs that would be perfectly usable, even ten years ago? But the fact remains that it’s innovations like these that keep the wheels of the economy turning. Here’s a selection of four inventions backed by huge social capital that hold immense promise for a better tomorrow… Neuropace Epilepsy is a debilitating disease...

  • Security is no longer just an IT concern, but is behaviour changing?

    If — and it’s a big if — there is a positive to the spate of information security headlines, then it could well be that more people will take an interest in the protection of their data and devices. There seems to have been a never-ending supply of headlines to worry people over the last few years. One of the most prominent ones has been the spate of stories related to the Edward Snowden leaks, covering the methods used by intelligence-gathering bodies to collect data from members of the public, businesses and other government bodies. Most recently it was revealed that...

  • Bitcoin’s first killer app? Bankymoon lets you pay your utility bills in digital currency

    We’re living in a world where everything’s being labeled as smart. From our phones to watches and even our cars. But something that’s really being taken for granted is our utility grids — including gas, water and electricity. And while the majority of the world might be migrating onto the so-called smart grids, they are still filled with a lot of dumb problems. The biggest being payments. South African bitcoin startup Bankymoon is boldly taking on this industry. That’s besides having a killer name for a bitcoin startup. Read more on Ventureburn.

  • Facebook’s Internet.org is coming to Nigeria #MWA2015

    Facebook on Wednesday announced plans to launch Internet.org app next month in Nigeria. The Internet.org app encourages telecoms to provide free and affordable access to certain web services like Facebook and Wikipedia. Announcing the plan for Nigeria, head of public policy for Facebook Africa Ebele Okobi, told participants at the Mobile West Africa 2015 conference, that the imminent launch in Nigeria follows similar ones in other African countries including Ghana, Zambia, Tanzania and Kenya. Speaking to Memeburn on the sidelines of the conference, she added that the app could be launched on more than one telecoms network in Nigeria, making the...

  • Project Fi, Google’s own wireless service finally launches

    This rumour, like rain on a cloudy day, has been circling for some time about Project Fi and now it is here. On Wednesday, Google finally launched its mobile phone service for voice and data use, Project Fi. For now, Project Fi is only available by invite only and works exclusively with Google’s Nexus 6 Android phone. According to Google, Project Fi is a programme to deliver a fast, easy wireless experience in close partnership with leading carriers, hardware makers, and its users. When connected to Project Fi, all of your voice and data activities will use that network....