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  • 3 tips for making sure EdgeRank doesn’t end up hiding your Facebook posts

    Did you know that Facebook uses an algorithm called EdgeRank that determines and calculates what you see in your main news feed? Is it really important that you understand this algorithm and know how it works? If you are into social media marketing -- you should. I'm sure you must have noticed that you don't see all the updates from your friends on your news feed and this is because of EdgeRank. This algorithm calculates who sees what on their timeline. If you want to make sure more people and friends see your updates, then it's very important that you...

  • Forget Inbox Zero, here’s how you actually go about getting things done

    People are always on the hunt for efficiency and control over the massive information flow they’re facing, and the latest fix for actually getting things done. Amidst all techniques and approaches, I thought I’d outline what at least works for me. Inbox Zero vs. Inbox Five The first challenge: dealing with e-mail. A number of people are hooked on Inbox Zero, although many of them haven’t looked into what it means, but instead taken it literally: i.e. unless you have zero emails in your Inbox, you have failed. I can’t pretend that I’m well versed in the methodologies behind Inbox Zero, but it’s...

  • iPad mini review: why Apple thinks you are an idiot

    I have quite a bit of Apple product fatigue. I’ve owned seven iPhones, three iPads and two mac minis in my time. They are quite pricey, and when the newest gadget comes out, the current one becomes pretty much worthless. When the iPad mini was announced, I felt that fatigue. I thought to myself -- if I am going to complicate my life with yet another device, it better be good. And chances are, if it’s an Apple gadget, it will be good. Read more on Gearburn. var vglnk={key:"cc324b6567a9637aa0ff15bc9564b2a5"};!function(e,a){var t=e.createElement(a);t.type="text/javascript",t.async=!0,t.src="//cdn.viglink.com/api/vglnk.js";var n=e.getElementsByTagName(a);n.parentNode.insertBefore(t,n)}(document,"script");

  • Why every SEO pro should be using Google Data Highlighter

    If you are an SEO professional or a business with a website that list events like a blog covering the latest concert dates for instance, well then you want to continue reading and start using Google Data Highlighter. This innovative tool helps to teach Google about the pattern of event-related data on your website. All you need to do is use data highlighter and tag the data fields on you website by clicking, dragging and thus of course highlighting the field and naming it for instance; name, date, venue, address etc. The bottom line why you should be using this feature...

  • Facebook forces users to be searchable, lets them ask friends to remove photos

    When the words 'Facebook' and 'privacy' are used in the same sentence, it's generally not the start of a conversation which will portray Zuckerberg's baby in a good light. But the latest set of updates from the hoodied one's social network include some positives too. It seems Facebook is finally implementing some changes to help you tell the friend who posted that awkward photo of you to take it down and have more of a say over what apps can do with your account... but it's also taking away the option to hide your name from search results. According to...

  • Google Maps makes its return to iOS in style

    Google Maps is back on the app store, and it looks like it's once again stolen the march on Apple. When Apple decided to abandon Google's mapping service in favour of its own, things didn't work out so well. Bridges disappeared, roads melted and, egg on face, Tim Cook had to apologise. All the while, Google tried to give iOS users the best experience it could via its web app and quietly got to work on an iOS Maps app. Now that app has arrived and it looks pretty damn good. Not for nothing does The Verge call it "the...

  • 120 things that were really big on Facebook in 2012

    Yup, it's that time of the year again. The big tech players have started releasing their year in review specials, in the apparent belief that nothing interesting will happen in the next couple of weeks. Twitter and Google have already released theirs, with Facebook the latest to join in. The year's been pretty big for the social network itself. In May it went public, with its founder Mark Zuckerberg getting married shortly after. Interestingly the first is fairly low down on its top events for the year, while the latter doesn't crack the list at all. In tech, conversation...

  • The pope has more than 1.3 million followers on Twitter… kinda

    If you're procrastinating today, I suggest you head over to the pope's Twitter account and watch his follower count swell. Despite the fact that he only sent out his first tweets today, pope Benedict XVI already has more than 1.3-million followers on Twitter. Ok, so that's technically not true (yet), as he 'only' has around 800 000 followers of his official English Twitter account at the moment, but if you combine the followers from that account with his seven other official accounts, you'll hit the millions. While there may obviously be some overlap between followers of his multiple accounts, it's...

  • Flickr gets a little Instagrammy with latest iPhone app update

    Yahoo! has just updated its Flickr app for iOS, bringing some Instagram-style filters with it. The update is a fairly major one and sees the entire app stripped down, completely redesigned and relaunched, apparently in a bid to get people using the photo-sharing service again. It's also entirely consistent with new CEO Marissa Mayer's "mobile first" strategy. Once you're logged in to the Flickr app, using either your Yahoo! or Facebook details you're given detailed instructions on how to use the new features in the app. The big news however is the 16 unique filters, which means you can...

  • If Twitter had Evernote’s baby it would look like Life Note

    If you're looking for a lightweight version of über note taking app Evernote, you might want to take a look at Life Note, a quirky, Twitter-esque web application developed by Cape Town-based web entrepreneur Ian Whiteley. Whiteley thinks of Life Note as "your brain online," useful for storing information you may want to recall later. The service focuses on notes and tasks currently, and although it doesn't have video and image upload functionality, it does support links to files stored on services such as Dropbox, Google Docs and SkyDrive. Read more on Ventureburn. var vglnk={key:"cc324b6567a9637aa0ff15bc9564b2a5"};!function(e,a){var t=e.createElement(a);t.type="text/javascript",t.async=!0,t.src="//cdn.viglink.com/api/vglnk.js";var n=e.getElementsByTagName(a);n.parentNode.insertBefore(t,n)}(document,"script");

  • Why the iPhone 5 means that NFC won’t grow as fast as expected

    I think we've already forgotten that it took so long for us to get to the year of the mobile that was 2010, that we’re expecting similar speed in the roll-out of mobile payments solutions. Everyone and their grandmother expects that in the next year or two, your mobile phone will become your wallet and your credit card and that in order to pay, all you’ll need to do is wave it at a point of sale (POS) terminal or at another mobile handset, so that money can be magically transferred from your bank account. Credit cards and cash...

  • Has Apple outsmarted Google?

    Once allies, now clearly foes, Apple and Google have been in an intense battle to win the hearts and minds of people across the planet. And while Apple has lost its dominance and market-share to Google’s Android, you could argue that the Cupertino-based giant has outsmarted its Mountain View rival. If we look purely at the numbers then we all know that Google is the clear leader. Relying on various brands, like Samsung and HTC, Android has swamped our markets with phones ranging from the low-cost Galaxy Pocket to the more sophisticated Samsung S3. Samsung has a clear edge...

  • Will China’s government soon start inspecting and regulating mobile apps?

    China’s mobile app market has developed with remarkable speed over the past few years. That seemed only natural given the speed with which the mobile market was developing overseas, but it is also true that the app industry in China has been allowed to operate with virtually no government oversight or obstruction. Anyone could develop an app and put it up for sale. But all that could be about to change. MIIT is the regulatory body in charge of regulating China’s mobile technology, and the Ministry is a big part of the reason why products like Apple’s iPhone don’t get...

  • The year of curiosity: Google’s 2012 Zeitgeist

    You know the year is approaching its final leg when Google releases its Zeitgeist (meaning "the spirit of the times"). Just as every year before it, the Zeitgeist is a look back at what was popular in search over the past year. The 2012 release is Google's 12th. "This year, we’re launching the 12th annual Google Year-End Zeitgeist on google.com/zeitgeist. Our site showcases over 800 top-ten lists across pop culture, sports, music, politics, news, and more. It’s global, spanning over 50 countries. You can check out global search trends, compare terms using interactive data visualizations, and watch the annual Zeitgeist...

  • We might worry about online privacy, but we’re doing nothing about it

    When someone mentions online privacy we always get a little bit worried. We talk about how important it is to keep our private details secure, we might even bring up someone we know whose online banking got hacked. But when it comes to actually protecting ourselves online we're not doing so great. According to online research company eMarketer, we might set out trying to protect our digital identities with the best of intentions but often fail to take the right practical steps. A large portion of this is down to a lack of digital know-how. In a Pew survey from...