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  • Headphones of the future won’t care if you mix up left and right

    The story about these headphones reminds me a lot of the urban legend about the space pen, but you know how you sometimes put the “L” bud in your right ear and the “R” in your left? Researchers at the Igarashi Design Interfaces Project in Tokyo, Japan have solved that. Instead of getting some headphones with distinct ear buds, spending a few seconds identifying which bud goes where, or you know, just not caring about the stereo mix — blasphemous I know, sorry audiophiles –, a pair of “Universal Earphones” that automatically switch audio channels when placed in the wrong ear could be...

  • 5 Great puzzlers for iOS

    Touch technology has given new life to the puzzler. Phones and tablets afford these games a crisp resolution that puts Mario to shame, great sound through your headphones, and a compactness that means you can solve away anywhere you are. It is this new intimacy of gaming that inspires our list of the top five iOS puzzle games. Contre Jour -- artistic design for the eyeball in everyone Hot on the heels of Cut the Rope, comes publisher Chillingo’s latest offering -- Contre Jour. Put on your headphones and indulge in an interactive experience that is both challenging and a...

  • Google brings in a ‘Bouncer’ to beef up Android security

    The Android marketplace has taken a bit of a beating in recent weeks, after it was found that a large number of the available apps were just fronts for malicious software (malware). In a bid to combat this, Google is rolling out new software called "Bouncer". Intimidating. In an official post on its mobile blog, the internet giant says Bouncer “provides automated scanning of Android Market for potentially malicious software without disrupting the user experience of Android Market or requiring developers to go through an application approval process”. According to Google, the new service "performs a set of analyses on...

  • Windows 8 phone, codenamed: ‘Apollo’ detailed

    We loved the last range of Windows phones from the ever-hopeful Nokia, namely the Lumia range. Windows 8 phones though, are hotter than the surface of the sun and twice as sexy as a champagne bubble bath filled with supermodels. This site has managed to eke out a full list of features which the new Windows 8 phones will be rolled out with. The platform has been clandestinely named “Apollo” by Windows Phone manager Joe Belifore who says, “The overarching theme with regards to the Windows 8 Phone hardware ecosystem will be scale and choice.” Translation: there will be expensive...

  • Facebook is a grown up company now [Interactive Timeline]

    Facebook's initial public offering (IPO) is that blockbuster movie we all waited years to go see, it was the Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings and Batman of the tech world. Mark Zuckerberg, the James Cameron who took eight years to create his masterpiece just waiting for the world to be ready for it. Now we have it. Facebook has filed and all over the internet everyone is talking about the Zuck and his US$100-billion company. Interesting fact, when the world's largest social network filed its S-1 papers, its 845-million users crashed the Securities and Exchange Commission's site. That's some...

  • The evolution of Foursquare: Memeburn talks to Dennis Crowley

    Foursquare checked into our lives in 2009 and has rapidly grown its user base to 15-million, tripling in just over a year. And now the US-based service reports that just over half of its users reside overseas, largely in emerging market countries. The social network is a piece of innovation that has won the hearts and minds of the fickle early-adopter crowd. It’s an online tool that plays in the rather hot and bubbly SoLoMo space. It’s a mobile-social network designed to give users information and recommendations about their immediate surroundings, allowing them to check in at venues. To say there...

  • Microsoft goes public with Gmail spoof

    Microsoft has posted its take on Google’s privacy policies, somewhat ironically, on YouTube. The campaign centres around the software giant’s bid to sell itself as a viable alternative for any Google users who find themselves frustrated by the search titan’s knack for delving into their private emails and chat messages in order to sell targeted advertising. The video features "the Gmail man" rifling through people's private post before delivering it. According to leading tech news site TheNextWeb, the video was first shown at Microsoft’s Global Exchange sales conference and leaked thereafter. Only recently, however, has Microsoft made the video...

  • Smartphones to play an increasingly important role in the future of M-Health

    More and more people get smartphones every day. It’s only natural, therefore, that they should play an increasingly important role in the mobile health sector. In fact, high-tech analysis firm Juniper Research reckons that some 3-million smartphone users will be using their devices for remote health monitoring by 2016. The monitoring of cardiac outpatients is currently leading the field, the research firm says, largely driven by reimbursement from US insurers. The management of other chronic diseases, such as diabetes and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder (COPD) will play an increasingly important role in the market. One way doctors are already...

  • Why 22Seven is most probably, but not necessarily, safe

    After reading one too many ignorant articles and tweets about how personal financial management startup 22Seven must be safe because Yodlee is safe and so on -- I cracked. I banged out a bunch of tweets in quick succession with the hash tag combination #22Seven my #2c. The response was interesting, ranging from "love your work" to respected tech journalist Simon Dingle’s "How do you know I'm not a computer scientist? And why does that matter? Do you have to be a chef to know when food is good?". I want Dingle’s tweet to be an entry...

  • 6 Facts that emerged from Facebook’s massive IPO

    The echo-chamber has flooded the web with all the details following the filing of Facebook’s IPO. It will raise $5 billion in the listing. It will be valued somewhere between US$75-billion and US$100-billion. We even know that the graffiti artist who took stock instead of cash for painting the walls at Facebook’s first HQ is now worth US$200 million. But what’s behind the numbers and how do they compare? 1. We're all going mobile Out of 825-million monthly users on Facebook, more than half -- 425-million active users -- access the site via mobile. These are people who use the site...

  • What a post IPO Facebook could learn from Google

    The media had been speculating on Facebook's IPO for months. On the day the social giant announced it would be going public, there was a veritable frenzy of reports. The tech world has only seen that kind of frenzy for an IPO once before: Google's back in 2004. I remember vividly the day Google filed its "red herring" with the SEC in preparation for its IPO. I was out at lunch when our bureau chief Richard Waters, called me, "They've filed." We were expecting it any day and this was the day, finally an end to what seemed an endless...

  • Amazon makes Indian eCommerce play

    Online retail giant Amazon is taking its first tentative steps into the Indian market, with the official launch of Junglee -- an online shopping aggregator. According to Amazopia (which bills itself as "the unofficial Amazon blog"), federal regulations stopped Amazon from entering the Indian market under its own branding. The laws are reportedly designed to "restrict foreign companies on multi-brand retail in the country". So while the site looks like Amazon and feels like Amazon, the only mention of the company you’ll see is a short message on the bottom right corner of the site saying "Service provided by...

  • If SOPA was an aircraft carrier, ACTA and TPP are nuclear submarines

    SOPA is on ice for now -- some say dead -- but we need to remain vigilant. It’s difficult however, when governments create new laws that threaten internet freedom of speech and privacy, in secret under the guise of trade agreements. There’s a lot of discussion around the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA). While some hail it as the next SOPA, others see it as less insidious. Much of the anti ACTA histrionics are actually ripple effects from the interpretation of earlier drafts of the agreement, but there are definitely key issues to be concerned about. What is ACTA? ACTA is an international...

  • Even teenagers don’t care about AR apps and QR codes

    Last year, it looked like augmented reality apps were on the cusp of becoming mainstream as numerous ad campaigns and mobile apps started to use the technology. The same goes for QR codes. For the most part though, neither has been able to go beyond being a gimmick yet and, according to a new study by youth marketing and research firm Ypulse, even the members of the tech-savvy Millennial generation either have no idea what QR codes and augmented reality apps are or don't see any value in these technologies. According to Ypulse's survey, high school and college students are...

  • Facebook’s $5-billion IPO has finally landed

    Facebook's much anticipated IPO is here. After months of waiting and speculating, the social media giant finally filed. The documents filed with regulators say the social network is hoping to raise US$5-billion, making it the biggest tech IPO in history. The company will be trading stocks using the FB symbol. "Facebook was not originally created to be a company," wrote CEO Mark Zuckerberg in his S-1 letter. "It was built to accomplish a social mission -- to make the world more open and connected... There is a huge need and a huge opportunity to get everyone in the world connected,...