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Facebook

  • How to download your Facebook data (and why you should)

    It's the F-word you've been hearing an awful lot of this week, and its one everyone should be using. Yes, Facebook. Please forgive me for swearing. The social network's still managing the fallout of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, and recent suggestions that it has been gaining call and messaging data through its Android apps. But the question on everyone's lips is: what does the company know about me? There's a really, really easy way to find out. Here's how to download your Facebook data, step by step. How to download your Facebook data Log into Facebook. From the home page, click the downward-pointing...

  • Facebook ‘clarifies’ creepy call, text logging claims

    After the Cambridge Analytica scandal piqued public panic last week, Facebook is again coming under fire for another user data issue. After the above news broke, Twitter user Dylan McKay published a screenshot detailing a particularly interesting set of data: a log of the outgoing, incoming and even missed calls he had received for two years. He made the discovery after downloading his Facebook data (You can download your own Facebook data right here). "Downloaded my facebook data as a ZIP file," McKay writes. "Somehow it has my entire call history with my partner's mum." Downloaded my facebook data as a ZIP file Somehow...

  • The Cambridge Analytica scandal, Facebook and deleting your account

    So people are talking about Facebook a lot this week. You know, that social network that only Baby Boomers seem to use now? It somehow has more than two-billion users at present, and that number for data collection firms is a goldmine just waiting to be ravaged. Speaking of which, one particular company through a series of ducks, dips, dives and dodges, has garnered a hefty slice of this information. Here's what you need to know about the Cambridge Analytica and Facebook data siphoning fiasco. What is Cambridge Analytica? Cambridge Analytica is a privately-owned firm based in London, England, but has satellite offices...

  • Facebook Lite hits the US, UK & other countries

    Facebook Lite, an Android version of the Facebook experience for lightweight devices and slower networks, will now launch in a gaggle of new countries. Users in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Ireland, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States can now download the app through the Google Play Store. Previously, users were required to download the APK on other app repositories. "To help make sure everyone can have a great Facebook experience regardless of where they connect, we rolled out Facebook Lite as a standalone, native app designed for lower end Android devices on spotty network connections to give people...

  • Infographic: Facebook celebrates Int’l Women’s Day with stats

    South Africa may celebrate National Women's Day on 8 August each year, but on 8 March the globe celebrates International Women's Day. "In 2017, International Women’s Day was the #1 most talked-about moment of the year," Facebook wrote in a post. "It was a moment that rallied the world around empowering women, and that was just the beginning of mounting energy for women’s movements that shows no signs of slowing down in 2018." Today, Facebook released some interesting stats about women on its social network and the impact International Women's Day has had on the site. According to the company, more than 40%...

  • Facebook adds video chat to Messenger Lite

    Facebook's Messenger Lite app -- a stripped down, bloat-free version of the eponymous chat app -- now has video calling. Messenger Lite is the social network's attempt to penetrate the low-network speed, budget smartphone bracket by stripping the Messenger experience to its core. Features like Facebook Stories (formerly Messenger Day) is not available in the app, but it also lacked other useful features like video calling when it launched last year. However, that's set to change. "In 2017, there were 17-billion video chats in Messenger, twice as many video chats compared to 2016," Facebook explains in an update, suggesting that video is one...

  • BlackBerry sues Facebook’s WhatsApp and Instagram for IP infringement

    The once mighty smartphone and tech giant BlackBerry is suing Facebook's Instagram and WhatsApp for allegedly copying features which first appeared on BlackBerry Messenger (BBM). Although BBM is no longer developed by BlackBerry, the company nonetheless saw it fit to protect "shareholder assets and intellectual property", a company spokesperson told Reuters. More than 2.1-million people still use BBM in South Africa, BBM CEO Matthew Talbot told Memeburn in a May 2017 interview. According to BlackBerry, Facebook is "using a number of the innovative security, user interface, and functionality enhancing features" within both Instagram and WhatsApp. There are seven patents listed within the filing....

  • Facebook survey asks if men grooming 14 year old girls ‘should be allowed’

    Do you think that requests from adult men for sexual pictures of 14 year old girls on Facebook should be allowed? That's what the social network wants to know from its users in what could be the creepiest survey ever placed on the site. According to a Twitter thread by The Guardian's digital editor Jonathan Haynes, Facebook decided to place this particular survey on his news feed. "So this popped up on Facebook," he tweeted, attaching a screenshot. "In thinking about an ideal world where you could set Facebooks’ policies, how would you handle the following," Facebook prefaces the survey, and...

  • Bug or business? Facebook joins the SMS spamming game [Update]

    Update: According to a note published on Friday by Facebook's Chief Security Officer Alex Stamos, it was indeed a bug. "When we heard about this, we looked into it right away," he began. "Two-factor authentication is an important security feature that has helped a lot of people mitigate the risk of phishing attempts and helps protect people from having their accounts compromised. We also give people control over their notifications, and the last thing we want is for people to avoid helpful security features because they fear they will receive unrelated notifications." He continued that it was "not our intention to send non-security-related...

  • Facebook lost daily active users in its most valuable markets

    Facebook rounded out a difficult 2017 by losing daily active users (DAUs) for the first time ever in the US and Canada, the company's most valuable markets. The number of DAUs in the region stood at 185 million in the third quarter and dropped just over 0.5% to 184 million by the fourth. Facebook lost daily active users in valuable markets, but the Zuck says it's all part of the plan It's unclear why the company took the hit. It may have to do with the way Russian actors targeted the platform to manipulate the 2016 US election, or Facebook may just have reached...

  • Facebook bans cryptocurrency ads

    Facebook has said it will ban ads related to financial products and services like cryptocurrency, binary options and initial coin offerings. The move is a bid to "improve the integrity and security of ads", as it believes that many companies promoting cryptocurrrency are scams and not operating "in good faith". Facebook has issued a ban on cryptocurrency ads for fear of scams With its technical jargon and complicated premise, cryptocurrency is a natural medium for scammers to lure in the uninformed. Initial coin offerings (ICOs) -- which offer buyers the chance to get in on a new cryptocurrency before launch -- provide a barely-regulated avenue...

  • Prepare to see more local news stories on Facebook this year

    Earlier this month, Facebook reevaluated its image as a social network rather than a media company, quelling its long-time urge to clog your news feed with content that's not created by friends. This seemingly signaled the beginning of the end for news on the site, but the company's head of news product Alex Hardiman explains that this isn't completely the case. News will still be a big priority for Facebook, but with a slight geographical tweak. "Today, we’re updating News Feed to also prioritize local news so that you can see topics that have a direct impact on you and your community...

  • Facebook Marketplace is now live in South Africa

    Facebook Marketplace is now available in South Africa... for some. Taking on the likes of OLX and Gumtree, Marketplace will allow users to formally buy and sell goods on the social network. From today for a select number of users, Facebook will boast a Marketplace icon in its navigation bar. Clicking it will take users to a page where they can browse goods, or put goods up for sale. According to the company, around 550-million users purchase and sell products on the social network. Anyone with a Facebook account can used the service, and it will require the usual information: an image of...

  • Facebook invents a new unit of time called Flicks

    Not content with just feeding you awkward revelations you wish your family had kept to themselves, Facebook now wants to toy with your time. Literally. The company this week announced a new unit of time, because seconds, minutes and hours are just way too cumbersome. Seriously though. Dubbed the flick, it's only slightly larger than a nanosecond, but is even more useful for those vested in video. And we all know video is the new cryptocurrency. "We've launched Flicks, a unit of time, slightly larger than a nanosecond that exactly subdivides media frame rates and sampling frequencies," the company's Open Source account tweeted. We've...

  • Facebook redirects focus to social interaction, leaving businesses in the dust

    In a post to Facebook Thursday, CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced that the company was changing its focus from providing users with "relevant" content to that which drives social interaction. The announcement is consistent with tests to the News Feed that Facebook ran last year, which moved all Page content (from the likes of businesses, brands, and media) from the News Feed to the Explore tab. But these tests were met with criticism. Take, for instance, the Serbian editor of a non-profit investigative journalism organisation who wrote an op-ed in the New York Times decrying the change as detrimental to Serbia's already shaky democracy. CEO Mark Zuckerberg...