• BURN MEDIA
    • Memeburn
      Tech-savvy insight and analysis
    • Gearburn
      Incisive reviews for the gadget obsessed
    • Ventureburn
      Startup news for emerging markets
    • Jobsburn
      Digital industry jobs for the anti 9 to 5!
  • Nevermind information overload, we live in an age of conversation overload

    I can deal with information overload — if I didn’t get to read that special article everyone is sharing then no big deal. But conversation overload is an entirely different thing. As a journalist I have trouble keeping up with the conversations in my email, yet today I have conversations everywhere and in new places. There’s email, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, my two blogs, then there are SMS messages, voicemail (which I never check) and the latest is: Google+. The problem with conversations is that they are more important than not reading that great article… Conversations are with people that I work...

  • Opera Mini taking advantage of shifts in global mobile-data business

    Opera Mini web-browsing software for smartphones has become an antidote for congested telecom networks and carrier bills that rise along with the amount of data streamed to handsets. As the popularity of smartphones and tablets continues to surge and telecom carriers shy away from all-you-can-eat wireless data plans, Opera is wooing users with technology that minimises bytes of data streamed over the air. Opera Mini was the world’s most popular mobile phone browser program in June with just shy of 23 percent of the market, according to figures from industry tracker StatCounter. Nokia and Android browsers were nearly tied for second place,...

  • Internet at the heart of everything: Q&A with Chrome OS

    Google’s Chrome operating system changes everything. It puts the internet at the centre of our computing experience. Chrome OS goes beyond software. Google has brought out Chromebooks that are “built and optimised for the web” promising an eight seconds boot time – the fastest to date. It also marks a dramatic new front in the fierce battle between Microsoft and Google. The search engine’s foray into operating systems is a strike at the very heart of Microsoft. Google is betting it will go all online. Microsoft thinks it will too, but is culturally an offline software company that is...

  • How to become an internet celebrity

    So you want to become an internet celebrity? Everybody else is one, so why not you? Fame, fortune and a Wikipedia entry are just one embarrassing YouTube video away. Alas, for every Justin Bieber there are hundreds of millions of people nobody has ever heard of. The chances of turning your fans and followers into dollars and cents are small, but for many the lure of becoming a trending topic on Twitter is enough. There are two main routes to becoming an online celebrity: Route 1 Start a blog (or a YouTube channel, or a Twitter profile), plug away at it, spend...

  • Tech news round-up: From Google+ to Google-

    We here at Memeburn know you our esteemed reader. Being the busy people you are we know that – try as you may, and as interested as you are — it’s not always possible to keep up with everything. In light of that, here’s your weekly roundup of all the important — and at times not so important — tech and online news items from the week. All Google+ed out How does one even begin to digest the tsunami of Google+ news this week? Well, of course you look to Memeburn. Here’s what we’ve looked at this week: How or if Google+...

  • Apple makes first pay-out to iPhone tracking victim

    US technology giant Apple announced that it had made its first compensation payment in South Korea on Thursday, over a feature on its iPhone that can track the location of users. Apple Korea confirmed it had paid one million won (US$950) to Kim Hyung-Suk, complying with a compensation order from a court in the southern city of Changwon. Kim, a 36-year-old lawyer, filed the suit on April 26. He said the smartphone’s location recording infringed on his constitutional rights to privacy and freedom and caused psychological stress. He demanded one million won, and the court ordered Apple to pay the sum for...

  • Is the TDL-4 monster the end guy?

    One of my favourite Bash.org quotes is “ I beat the internet… the end guy is hard”. Now it looks like the Internet really does have an ‘end guy’. “TDL-4″ is a trojan that has infected more than 4-million PCs and anti-virus experts are touting it as near-indestructible. This nasty piece of work infects the MBR (Master Boot Record) of any PC that it manages to get installed onto, and then joins up with a massive peer-to-peer botnet. What makes it so sophisticated is the number of interesting features that its makers have built into it. Firstly, the fact that...

  • Olympus XZ-1 pushes many, many of the right compact buttons

    It’s been a long time since Olympus gave us a ‘proper’ compact – that hard to define, small, point & shoot that’s designed for the serious picture taker that wants something that’s small enough to always be on them. The re-introduced PEN interchangeable lens compacts showed the revival of interest in this market, and the ten megapixel XZ-1 takes us the rest of the way.

  • Google profits soar as the company goes social

    Google has released blockbuster earnings figures along with word that more than 10 million people have already joined its freshly-launched online social network. Google stock prices climbed more than 12 percent to US$595.80 after release of the earnings figures by executives who effused about Google+, YouTube, Android and other products promising even better days ahead for the company. “If you look at the arsenal we are building it is really quite formidable”, Patrick Pichette, Google’s chief financial officer said during an earnings conference call. Google reported that its profit climbed to US$2.51 billion in the recently-ended fiscal quarter on record-high revenue. “We had...

  • On aggregating and rewriting: It’s all a steal!

    Gabe Rivera, founder of the excellent TechMeme is irked that the term “aggregator” is being misapplied especially within the context of the HuffPost event earlier this week: Adweek Slams HuffPost But What About Adweek Senior Editor Michael Wolff’s Newser?. His argument is that the Huffington Post is not an aggregator, people rewrite other people’s stories and that’s different to what Techmeme does, which is to aggregate headlines to stories. What irked me was the reminder that “aggregator” is a rather broad-brush term that paints systematic news-rewriters like the Huffington Post (who bury links) as cousins to snippet-quoting sites like Techmeme and...

  • China whiz builds homebrew D-I-Y-pad

    An enterprising Chinese man has come up with a solution for gadget-crazy people who desperately want Apple’s popular iPad tablet computer but cannot afford it – DIY. In a 20-minute video posted on Chinese video site Youku (original here, YouTube copy here), Liu Xinying demonstrates how to assemble an iPad lookalike using computer parts, a touch screen and a case with a keypad, to the sound of Linkin Park. While you can fault his taste in video soundtrack, you can’t fault his Do-It-Yourself skills. At the end of the video dubbed “DIY IPAD 3″, the IT whizz shows off...

  • Sony drops $20-mil into games for PlayStation Network

    Sony Computer Entertainment America has revealed a plan to invest $20 million in unique games tailored exclusively for PlayStation Network (PSN). The money will be distributed during the coming three years to Sony affiliated studios as well as to independent game makers chosen for backing by a “Pub Fund” the Japanese entertainment colossus established in 2009. The move is part of a strategy by Sony to win more fans to its online PSN for PlayStation 3 videogame console users by providing enticing games unavailable at rivals such as Xbox Live. This investment comes as analysts try estimate the cost to...

  • The black marks: Zuckerberg’s legal legacy

    As with most semi-biographical films, The Social Network convinces many who watch it that they develop a comprehensive knowledge of its subject matter, in this case the origins of Facebook and its founder’s misdeeds. As well researched a movie as it was, there is more to the litigation surrounding these two then what was included in David Fincher’s chronicle. So, in order to level the playing field, this is all the dirt we know about the man who created the system that knows all the dirt about us. The metaphorical photo album that Zuckerberg would surely want to un-tag...

  • An ode to Prezi

    It started as a casual flirtation. I was perfectly content with my presentation software at the time, and while Prezi was new and stylish and slick, and I gave it admiring glances in passing, I saw no reason at the time to break up with good old fashioned Microsoft Powerpoint. But a few years and several conferences down the line, the tedious, endless, same old, same old presentations became a little too much. While Powerpoint remains a useful way of organising my holiday photos, if I was going to wake anyone up with my conference presentation, I needed something new....

  • PayPal deal lets Google phones swap cash

    Online financial transactions giant PayPal showcased a mini-program on Wednesday that lets people exchange money by touching together a pair of Google smartphones. The software “widget” takes advantage of near-field communication (NFC) chips in Nexus S mobile phones powered by Android mobile operating systems. “You have to use it to believe it, but with a simple ‘buzz’ you’ll be able to transact with friends, family, colleagues and employees easier than ever before,” PayPal senior mobile director Laura Chambers said in a blog post. “Sometimes the most obvious solutions are the most elegant,” she added. The feature is to be available by September and...