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  • Landing Page Optimisation and its true place in web strategy

    Like the landing lights at an airport; Landing Page Optimisation is there to ensure that your visitors know exactly what they need to do on your site and then actually do it. But where does Landing Page Optimisation/Website Optimisation fit into your online strategy? Web strategies are only as good as the page that your visitor lands on. Quite simply put, this means that website optimisation needs to form part of the very core of your website strategy. In fact, landing page optimisation is only one small aspect of a far greater picture that many marketers have not yet started...

  • The ‘Lulz’ are over: Lulzsec calls it quits

    Following an internet rampage which ranged from the silly — defacing a news site to show that TuPac, famed US rapper, was alive — to the serious — attacks on key US government sites, including the CIA, Lulzsec has announced that it is closing up shop. In a document loaded to Pastebin, then linked in a tweet through what has come to be viewed as the group’s official Twitter account, Lulzsec announced that after 50 days of Lulz, the game was over. The statement went on to say: We are Lulz Security, and this is our final release, as...

  • A new age in cyber warfare — Anonymous, LulzSec and Stuxnet

    Growing up in the nineties, television and film made me believe that hackers could do anything. I pictured an emaciated Russian teenager typing on the keyboard of his multiple monitor display, green text scrolling down a black screen. Those scrawny fingers could assume identities or muddle up traffic lights. They were the dark practitioners of mysterious arts. Those were the early days of the web, though, when it was all still a bit wild west. It was before the September that never ended. The internet is supposed to be safe and established these days. Surely internet security experts,...

  • Seven tools for developing your own mobile apps

    Mobile is the world’s fastest growing platform. As a result many individuals and firms have turned to mobile applications to more effectively engage their audience. This is no easy task, however, since creating these apps requires a good command of advanced programming languages such as Objective C (iOS) or Java (Android). Fortunately, a number of tools have been created which open this space up to both novices and web designers. These development tools enable the development of mobile applications using drop and drag interfaces or web technologies. These tools then translate your code so it can be understood by...

  • What will be in iPhone 5? Gearburn predicts

    We’re starting to get some whiffs of the iPhone 5, some real, some imagined. It is supposed to release in September, and bets are that Apple will once more comprehensively conquer the cool end of the smartphone market. Gearburn has sniffed around, and come up with our predictions of what will be in and out in the fifth generation of the phone that made Apple’s fortunes. We are so delighted with our top-of-the-line gadgets, content even. But the instant an upgrade appears it becomes about as appealing as a pork sandwich in a kosher deli. For close to a decade...

  • Six reasons why your email marketing campaign is failing

    In the midst of the rise of social media and mobile marketing, email marketing still continues to rake-in an impressive ROI, but that doesn’t make it any easier to get right. Eye catching, relevant content, SPAM filters, deliverability, design and rendering are just a few of the aspects that marketers need to give serious consideration to when compiling an email campaign. When it’s done right, the rewards speak for themselves. When it goes wrong though, your campaign could land up looking more like a Picasso Cubism painting (in a junk folder) than an example of fine email design. It’s...

  • From ‘Winklevii’ to Facebook gunmen – This week in tech and web news

    We here at Memeburn know you our esteemed reader. Being the busy people you are we know — that, try as you may, and as interested as you are — it’s not always possible to keep up with everything. In light of that, starting today, you can expect this weekly Friday column giving a roundup of all the important — and at times not so important — tech and online news items from the week. But there’s more! As an added bonus, it’ll come with that special Memeburn spin you’ve come to enjoy… Mark Zuckerberg wins again After a marathon seven...

  • Meego’s last gasp with Nokia as N9 unveiled

    Nokia’s latest attempt to win back market share with its N9 phone received mixed reviews this week as it was shown to analysts and media at ComminAsia in Singapore. It is likely the last major phone Nokia will show running the promising Linux-based mobile operating system before it throws its lot in with Microsoft and Windows Phone 7. Fans lauded the N9′s ease of use without any “home” button — a feature of the iPhone and other rivals — while detractors mocked what they saw as its outdated Meego operating system. Unveiled by Nokia chief executive Stephen Elop at the CommunicAsia...

  • Google to face US antitrust probe

    The US Federal Trade Commission is poised to open a formal antitrust probe into whether Internet search giant Google has abused its dominance on the Web, The Wall Street Journal reported on Thursday. The newspaper, citing “people familiar with the matter,” said the FTC is preparing to serve Google with civil subpoenas “signalling the start of a wide-ranging, formal antitrust investigation.” Wall Street Journal sources say the five-member FTC commission will send Google the formal demands for information “within days” and other companies were likely to receive requests for information about their dealings with Google. The FTC declined to comment on the...

  • SEACOM extends internet connectivity for Zimbabwe

    SEACOM, the privately owned African internet connectivity provider, this week announced it had reached a deal with Mozambique to provide a new link to landlocked and much beleaguered Zimbabwe. In a press statement, the ICT company stated it had, “…signed a Master Services Agreement with Telecomunicações de Moçambique (TDM), the leading telecommunications service provider in Mozambique”. What this agreement means is that TDM, a state-owned company, will allow its fibre-optic network to be used to link Zimbabweans to SEACOM’s cable running along the Mozambican coast. “This agreement with TDM demonstrates our commitment to partner with established players to improve the range of...

  • Social media and the politics of disclosure: The Womma study

    After the response to the “Social Media Rate card” of popular radio DJ Gareth Cliff, key questions have arisen about how people and companies disclose their advertising relationships on social network platforms. Of course anyone, including Cliff, are in their rights to advertise products via “word-of-mouth” to their Twitter followers or Facebook friends, but there is a growing body of opinion on how social network-users should disclose this powerful type of advertising. Social media has disrupted the world of marketing, blurring boundaries and upsetting traditional advertising and media channels. We see this all the time. Individuals who tweet or Facebook...

  • How does Google’s ‘+1′ measure up to Facebook’s ‘Like’?

    Google was founded on the mantra of “give the users what they want and the rest will follow” and the launch of +1 (Plus One) is an attempt at just that. The search giant realised that Facebook’s “Like” button allowed Facebook access to key data concerning a user’s preferences online. By Liking and +1’ing, users are sending messages not only to their peers but also to the companies (read: Search Engines and Social Networks) who are providing the service. Whilst Google’s Pagerank algorithm might take into account aspects like links between sites, the actual content on the site...

  • India to investigate antitrust complaints against Apple

    India may investigate a complaint against Apple after allegations that the US computer giant violated local competition laws, an antitrust agency official told Dow Jones Newswires Wednesday. The official, who spoke to Dow Jones on condition of anonymity, said the complainant alleged Apple had broken Indian law by selling its iPhone 4 model through just two local mobile phone operators, Bharti Airtel and Aircel. Apple’s model of selling its iPhone through a limited number of operators, particularly in the States where the first model of the iPhone was only available through AT&T, has seen the Cupertino based company face criticism before. In...

  • Amazon bigwigs to jet into Cape Town for ‘Grand Opening’

    The world’s most famous online retailer, Amazon.com, is gearing up for a big launch in Cape Town, with bigwigs flying into the country from the States. Among the executives will be Marc Onetto, Amazon’s Senior Vice President of Operations and Customer Service. Onetto will be joined in August by members of the press for what Amazon are calling a “Grand Opening”. The VP will view a “new facility”, which is essentially the company’s upgraded call centre that was set up last year. The centre, which has been operational since October 2010, came with the promise of 600 new jobs in its...

  • Dropbox, leading cloud computing service, suffers security failure

    Since the announcement of iCloud, cloud computing and other cloud services have leapt from the tech-world and into the world at large. With this excitement and popularity has come a fair amount of scrutiny, mainly asking whether cloud services can keep our data safe and secure? For leading cloud-service Dropbox the answer to that question was yes — until Sunday. It had been reported that on Sunday some users noticed they were allowed into their Dropbox account after entering the wrong password. Confirming the reports, Dropbox has now revealed that what happened was that for four hours there was a “bug”...