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  • 8 comic book movie viral campaigns that rocked

    Almost better than any film adaption of a comic book, is the anticipation built up from the viral campaigns which leak out from the silver tap of Hollywood. The internet has become a bridge which connects the public to their childhood memories and marketing agencies are quick to pounce on our nostalgia in the form of videos, online games and interactive websites which slowly reveal the next major blockbuster. In the past decade, the internet has assisted in marketing the release of a number of comic book films. Memeburn decided to take a look at some of the best....

  • 4 first world marketing mistakes to avoid making

    There’s an old adage that goes, “you need to break a few eggs to make a cake”. This doesn’t mean, however, that you have to break every egg you have in order to get the cake just right. There is a bit of an advantage to being in an emerging economy. The fact that first world markets have gone through the pain of developing and learning online marketing techniques first means there is a wealth of knowledge which emerging economies can learn from in order to ensure that their online marketing strategy is optimally efficient and not always exploratory. Why...

  • Anonymous hacked while announcing operation to ‘kill’ Facebook

    “Hacktivist” group Anonymous has issued yet another threat of a cyber attack, this time against Facebook, reports tech blog Mashable. The loosely organised group of hackers has declared, in a statement aimed at the global body of Facebook users, that “your medium of communication you all so dearly adore will be destroyed”. The statement goes on to explain the reasoning for what has been dubbed, “OpFacebook”: Facebook has been selling information to government agencies and giving clandestine access to information security firms so that they can spy on people from all around the world. Some of these so-called whitehat infosec firms are...

  • Camera for all seasons – Samsung NX11 vs Canon SX30

    Back-to-back Review: The Samsung NX11 and Canon SX30 bridge cameras are aimed at the same photographer, but take different approaches. Both very light and very compact, ideal for doing the tourist or family holiday thing. One goes with an interchangeable lens system, one with a beast of a lens that does everything. Ish. Cameras in the bridge camera segment have, for a long time, been squeezed between their little brothers, the steadily more powerful and capable point-and-shoots, and big brother SLRs, particularly the low end consumer DSLRs – and to an extent, bridge cameras have had the disadvantages of...

  • DA leader addresses Twitter critics

    Helen Zille, leader of South Africa’s largest opposition party, has responded to a recent spat between herself, officials from her party, and South African singer Simphiwe Dana that played out on Twitter. The spat began when Dana directed a number of barbed political points toward Zille on the microblog, to which the Democratic Alliance leader replied in kind, characterising them as “baseless assertions”. Dana and like-minded Twitter users then began sending Zille and other DA officials a series of increasingly difficult-to-answer tweets. The spat peaked when DA spokesperson Lindiwe Mazibuko, in a move reminiscent of the ANC Youth League’s characterisation of Twitter...

  • How ‘Dunbar’s Number’ can make or break a social network

    Take a moment to think about what you expect from a social network. It doesn’t matter whether you’re thinking about one-size-fits all megaliths like Facebook and Twitter or a site for professionals or even the incredibly specialised niche sites Memeburn drew your attention to recently. It really all boils down to one word: Connections. Connections, whether they be between friends, followers of celebrities or working professionals, are at the crux of every social network. So how would a social network “fail”? It’s largely when these connections are interrupted. The factors that can cause this interruption are multiple but like...

  • Sony, Panasonic, Samsung to make universal 3D glasses

    Japan’s Sony and Panasonic and South Korea’s Samsung Electronics have announced that they will jointly develop new standards for glasses used to watch 3D images on television, computer and movie screens. The three Asian consumer electronics giants, working with European technology firm X6D Limited, said their collaboration will cover a technology called “3D active glasses”, according to their joint statement. The universal glasses — which can be used on TVs from all three firms — will go on sale in 2012 and will be compatible with 3D sets being released this year, the companies said. “Today’s announcement marks a unique collaboration of...

  • Facebook Messenger app launches

    Facebook has launched a messaging application for use on both Android and iPhones. An engineer within Facebook, Lucy Zhang said that the messaging app can be used to not only exchange messages within the user’s Facebook friends, but also to send messages on a user’s mobile phone contact list. In a Facebook blog post Zhang explained the relevance of the product, saying, “When you’re on the go, coordinating a bunch of people can be tricky, especially if plans change at the last minute. With Messenger, you can quickly start a group conversation and message everyone at once.” Facebook has also...

  • Bad year for China: 500 000 cyber attacks in 2010

    China, in a recently released statement, said that it had been the target of close to 500 000 cyber attacks during 2010. Many of the attacks came from foreign countries such as India (8 percent based on IP activity) and the US (14.7 percent based on IP activity); this was according to a government report issued from the port city of Dalian where the National Computer Network Emergency Response Coordination Centre is located. The bulk of these attacks came from Trojan applications which are used by hackers to gain access to specifically targeted computers. China has, in the past, been...

  • Write, heat, write again with rewritable ‘paper’

    A group of scientists in Taiwan has developed a rewritable electronic paper that needs no power source to maintain display of an image printed on it, and just needs to be re-heated to wipe it for re-use up to 260 times. Unlike the e-book technology now available on the market, the rewritable e-paper called “i2R e-paper” does not need to be back lit and therefore does not consume electricity, according to the island’s top industrial research unit Industrial Technology Research Institute. Read more on Gearburn.com

  • ‘The last reason for me to use the internet is over': The Onion paywall

    World famous news parody site The Onion is now insisting users must pay to access its content. A new paywall has been erected which limits the amount of content users can see before having to pay a fee. The paywell is similar to those put up around the sites of The New York Times, The Times of London and the Wall Street Journal but slightly less restrictive. Onion users are given a maximum of five premium page views on the site, before a notification pops up detailing the payment structures required to continue viewing the site. Users are given the...

  • OpenStack: Toward an open ‘Cloud’ infrastructure

    Moving to “the Cloud” is all the buzz nowadays. I personally hate the terminology, and while it may seem a pretty novel concept to some, the principles behind “cloud” computing are pretty old-hat. The idea is fairly simple, instead of hosting all of your own data and applications locally, you take advantage of the internet to handle everything. If you’re using a webmail service, you’re already doing cloud computing. The real technical genius behind it all is that the provisioning of services and access should be fairly instantaneous, and to do that most businesses that want to provide Software...

  • Inbox beat-down: How social media rivalry is impeding email deliverability

    Recently, both Google and Facebook have — within 24 hours of each other — initiated major manoeuvres to become the unequivocal masters of the inbox. With the social media migration deadlock still hanging in the balance after the launch of Google+, the email arena has been primed as the next battlefield between the information superpowers. In the blue corner: Facebook is now gunning to consolidate its users’ social and email activities all under one roof, re-inventing itself as a major email service provider (ESP) by adding a few frills to its own in-house email service and promoting its use more...

  • Anonymous takes down Syrian Ministry of Defence site

    Hacker group Anonymous, has taken down yet another governmental site in its declared war against global injustice. The group has removed the Syrian Ministry of Defence website and posted, in its place, a series of videos, images, and a message demanding the removal of current president, Bashar Al-Assad. The message, which is printed in both Arabic and English says: “To the Syrian people: The world stands with you against the brutal regime of Bashar Al-Assad. Know that time and history are on your side – tyrants use violence because they have nothing else, and the more violent...

  • 9 ways Twitter is good for democracy

    We all know tweeting isn’t the same as voting and that most people on Twitter are observers rather than participants. I’ve long believed, however, that Twitter has the potential to make a significant contribution to a culture of openness, inclusiveness and what it means to be a member of the body politic, and the more I scroll through my timeline, the more I see evidence that this is the case. Here are 9 ways that Twitter is good for democracy. 1. First, and most obviously, access to Twitter is not easily controlled. We’ve seen the power of social media...