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      Because cars are gadgets
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      Incisive reviews for the gadget obsessed
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      Startup news for emerging markets
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      Digital industry jobs for the anti 9 to 5!
  • Sigma 120-300mm ‘Sports’ lens review: slow focus, impressive range

    The newest lens from Sigma marks the start of the company's "Sports" line of lenses. This is the Sigma 120-300mm F2.8 DG OS HSM Lens available for Canon, Nikon and Sigma mounts. There are a few reviews out on this lens already, all very technical. So I'd like to gear this one towards the consumer photographer, pro-consumer or hobbyist. This is a review about what you will (and won't) get from this lens, and what kinds of shots you can capture with this impressive telephoto lens... you'll be surprised. Read more on Gearburn. var vglnk={key:"cc324b6567a9637aa0ff15bc9564b2a5"};!function(e,a){var t=e.createElement(a);t.type="text/javascript",t.async=!0,t.src="//cdn.viglink.com/api/vglnk.js";var n=e.getElementsByTagName(a);n.parentNode.insertBefore(t,n)}(document,"script");

  • Screw the startups, Africa needs more ‘netrepreneurs’

    It’s the dream of any tech-person: come up with an idea or concept that you can build up and sell off for millions. Consider something as banal as Draw Something which only a few weeks after its release was sold to Zynga for US$180-million. Everyone wants the “Big Score”. Technology and App Development in South Africa, Nigeria and Kenya have pushed hard towards finding thing that will make venture capitalists and sponsors sit up and notice. Startups seem to be all about the quick get-in and get-out; lacking very little substance. Read more on Ventureburn. var vglnk={key:"cc324b6567a9637aa0ff15bc9564b2a5"};!function(e,a){var t=e.createElement(a);t.type="text/javascript",t.async=!0,t.src="//cdn.viglink.com/api/vglnk.js";var n=e.getElementsByTagName(a);n.parentNode.insertBefore(t,n)}(document,"script");

  • Russia pushing for tighter net control thanks to Snowden

    "I don’t want to live in a world where there is no privacy and therefore no room for intellectual exploration and creativity," said former NSA employee Edward Snowden in an interview with The Guardian. It seems revealing the truth has more than one double-edged sword. Snowden, the world's most hunted whistle-blower, fled the United States because he did not want to live a country where individuals' data were monitored by the government. Now in Russia, where he says he will stay a while, as he seeks asylum from some 25 countries, the former NSA leaker's presence is prompting the Russian...

  • Indonesia considers fining BlackBerry $1.5 million for future BBM outages

    After successfully bullying BlackBerry to block porn access from its devices, the Indonesian government now thinks it might be a good idea to fine BlackBerry IDR 1 000 ($0.10) per subscriber if BlackBerry Messenger service, the ubiquitous BBM, suffers another outage for over four hours. With BlackBerry having about 15-million subscribers in Indonesia, that will amount to US$1.5-million. According to local news site Detik, the scheme proposed by Indonesia’s telecoms regulator (BRTI) is simple. After the next BBM outage occurs, BlackBerry has to directly refund Indonesian subscribers to their phone credit. This past month alone, there have been two major...

  • Radiohead’s Thom Yorke calls Spotify, Rdio unfair to artists, pulls albums

    Streaming audio services such as Spotify and Rdio are deeply unfair and "bad for new music". That's the view of Radiohead front-man Thom Yorke who has announced that he's pulling a number of his albums from the service. As of Sunday, reports the Wall Street Journal, Yorke had pulled down his 2006 solo album “The Eraser”. The band Atoms for Peace, which Yorke also leads, had meanwhile pulled its 2013 album "Amok". Nigel Godrich, a member of Atoms for Peace and Radiohead’s producer, took to Twitter to explain the reasoning behind the decision. The reason is that new artists...

  • Apple investigating after woman dies after being shocked by her iPhone

    Don't use your iPhone while it's charging. That's the warning from a Chinese woman after her younger sister died after reportedly being electrocuted by her charging iPhone 5. According to China Daily, 23-year-old Ma Ailun died after being shocked by her cellphone when she tried to answer a call. Ma's sister took to Sina Weibo to share the story, asking for people to warn their friends not to use iPhones while charging them, and explaining that the family had handed the phone over to the police as part of the investigation into the incident. While counterfeit phones are a problem in...

  • Spidey suit set to get MP3 capabilities in upcoming film

    As is the case with most established superheroes, Spiderman's suit has become an institution in its own right. There are certain things you just don't mess with, but that doesn't mean it can't evolve. Take the one set to be worn by Andrew Garfield in The Amazing Spiderman 2, for instance. It's still recognisable as the costume worn by everyone's favourite web-slinger, but it comes with a few enhancements and one of them in particular is sure to fuel plenty of debate among the comic book set. In an interview with Entertainment Weekly costume designer Deborah Lynn Scott said...

  • 12 ways to nail that digital advertising award

    The very first time I attended the Loeries (South Africa's largest advertising awards) at Sun City back in 2000, I danced with Lowe Bull and Bull-Whitehouse founder Matthew Bull and had no idea who the hell he was. I learnt that advertising people were a bunch of unruly, scary, crazy people. But I also realised that I wanted to walk up on that stage one day and feel that rock-star feeling when grasping a golden award. As I grow in advertising, I’ve come to realise that winning is not everything but it sure does open the doors for you,...

  • Your grammar is irrelevant — how technology is influencing language

    Love it or hate it, our interaction with our digital devices greatly influences the way we communicate. In fact, it has the potential to render the English language as we know it null and void given enough time. Take a moment to reflect on how you reacted to the statement above. Were you immediately enraged, mentally preparing a scathing comment in perfectly punctuated language? Chances are you are a writer, linguist or purist, the bane of many a sloppy online speller's existence and, sorry to say it, part of a dying breed. Did you stifle a mental yawn, go...

  • If you need a how-to on real-time stunts, look at Greenpeace.

    Both sides won in a real-time stunt with high stakes. Yes, it was dangerous. Yes it will likely not stop anything but you have to hand it to the Greenpeace-rs, they get column inches and people buzzing. For those that don’t live by the Shard (like me) or pick up the Evening Standard to avoid looking at other people on the Underground, Greenpeace took six ladies and got them to climb the Shard in London in the cause of stopping large oil companies drilling in the Arctic. What Greenpeace got right: 1. Live is the new black...

  • Big data: not just a buzzword but a fact of life

    Big data. These two words have surfaced on almost every technology outlet recently and many people have been as uninspired by them as they were by the word “cloud”. The problem is that while it is an intellectually understandable concept – human beings are generating data at an astonishing rate – there is no clear explanation as to what this actually means for the user, the business or the world. Let’s start by analysing what the term big data means. There is an infographic created by DOMO and Column Five Media that shows exactly how much data we generate every...

  • Dropbox’s dreams and hiding from the NSA: top stories you should read

    Take some cloud storage, throw in a bit of paranoia and a self driving car and what do you get? Some of the top tech stories featured in this week's round up. Ok, so it's a little bit more than that -- we also take a look at Pandora's PR problem and how London's Tech City got off the ground: Dropbox blows up the box, connecting every app, file, and device It started out as a simple cloud storage offering that meant you no longer had to email yourself stuff -- but now Dropbox is becoming much more. Wired speaks to the...

  • M-commerce in South Africa: a huge opportunity waiting to explode

    The definition for mobile commerce (m-commerce) has expanded as technology and mobile methods have evolved, from the initial Premium Rate SMS payments for 8-bit ringtone purchases to Near Field Communications-enable smart phones where a simple swipe at the POS is all that is required to purchase your new skinny jeans. A well accepted definition describes m-commerce as the payment for goods/services with a mobile device such as phone, PDA, or other such device. This is the general definition for both digital goods (such as in-game upgrades) and physical goods (such as shopping for shoes on Amazon’s mobile app) are...

  • Nigerians should be able to shop online regardless of perception

    Nigeria's internet legacy seems to have left a complicated problem for citizens wanting to get into the technological age. In the last decade Nigeria has been synonymous with online scams commonly known as 419. The country's electronic payment endeavours have been tainted by the perceptions created by these scams. Speaking at the Jumia ecommerce conference in Lagos, Nigeria's Minister for Communications Technology Omobola Johnson says that "Nigerians want to buy online" regardless of the fears. She reckons that the country shouldn't miss out because payments from the country aren't widely accepted. Johnson says that most Nigerian credit cards are...

  • Nokia’s Lumia 1020: a great camera, but is that enough?

    In New York, Nokia launched the Lumia 1020, a massive phone with a 4.5-inch display and a crazy 41-megapixel sensor. It could be Nokia’s most ambitious phone yet, but do you still really care about gimmicky features that you’ll only use every so often? Nokia’s making a play with some serious imaging hardware, but will this be a phone for the everyday user? We posted the specs and hardware earlier, so it’s up to Nokia to wow us with a few surprises at least. Read more on Gearburn. var vglnk={key:"cc324b6567a9637aa0ff15bc9564b2a5"};!function(e,a){var t=e.createElement(a);t.type="text/javascript",t.async=!0,t.src="//cdn.viglink.com/api/vglnk.js";var n=e.getElementsByTagName(a);n.parentNode.insertBefore(t,n)}(document,"script");